The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 22 December 2018

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDF: The Sentinel_ period ending 22 Dec 2018

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles and abstracts from 100+ peer-reviewed journals  [see PDF]

UN General Assembly officially endorsed the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration

Migration

General Assembly officially adopts roadmap for migrants to improve safety, ease suffering
19 December 2018, New York
The United Nations General Assembly officially endorsed the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration on Wednesday, a non-binding agreement adopted in Marrakech on 10 December by 164 Member States, and described by UN chief António Guterres as a “roadmap to prevent suffering and chaos”.

The UN Secretary-General explained in a statement released after the vote that the document “reaffirms the foundational principles of our global community, including national sovereignty and universal human rights, while pointing the way toward humane and sensible action to benefit countries of origin, transit and destination as well as migrants themselves”.

Mr. Guterres stressed that the Compact “calls for greater solidarity with migrants in situations of appalling vulnerability and abuse,” that it “underscores the need to anticipate future trends”, and that it “highlights the imperative of devising more legal pathways for migration.”

Louise Arbour, UN Special Representative for International Migration, who led the conference deliberations over the Compact in the Moroccan city of Marrakech last week, said that he formal endorsement “represents a resounding commitment to an international migration framework based on fact, not myth, and to an understanding that national migration policies are best implemented through cooperation not in isolation.”

The document, the first-ever negotiated global framework on a common approach to international migration in all its dimensions, was adopted by the General Assembly with 152 votes in favour, 12 abstentions, and five votes against, namely by the Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, Poland, and the United States of America. An additional 24 Member States were not present to take part in the vote.

Though non-legally binding, the Compact is the outcome of a long negotiation process and provides a strong platform for cooperation on migration, drawing on best practice and international law.

Thanking all those who “helped to bring this landmark step to fruition,” including civil society, migrants, diaspora communities, the private sector, trade unions, academic experts and municipal leaders, the UN chief said he hoped the “countries that have chosen to remain outside the process will come to see the Compact’s value and join this venture”.

In statements explaining their decisions, countries that voted for the document stated often stressed the fact that this document is only a first step and that its realization will be where the work really starts. The sentiment was echoed by the UN chief who said that “leadership will be crucial in bringing the Compact to life, and in avoiding the myths and disparaging discourse that have become all too frequent”.

The UN Secretary-General noted that the United Nations, through the newly established UN Migration Network, stands ready to support Member States and all partners “to make migration work for all.”

General Assembly Endorses Landmark Global Compact on Refugees, Adopting 53 Third Committee Resolutions, 6 Decisions Covering Range of Human Rights

Refugees

General Assembly Endorses Landmark Global Compact on Refugees, Adopting 53 Third Committee Resolutions, 6 Decisions Covering Range of Human Rights
17 December 2018
The General Assembly endorsed the Global Compact on Refugees today — an historic agreement aiming to forge a stronger and fairer response to refugee movements — as it adopted 53 resolutions and 6 decisions recommended by its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural).

By a resolution on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, adopted by a recorded vote of 181 in favour to 2 against (Hungary, United States), with 3 abstentions (Eritrea, Liberia, Libya), the Assembly underscored the importance of the Global Compact on Refugees — as presented by the High Commissioner in part II of his annual report — as an expression of political will to activate the principle of burden- and responsibility-sharing.

Germany’s representative, also speaking on behalf of France and the Netherlands, called the Compact a “major step” towards providing sustainable solutions to the world’s refugees and those who host them. Hungary’s representative, explaining her vote against the resolution, said there is no need for new instruments, as existing international frameworks adequately address refugee issues. Further, the Global Compact fails to distinguish between refugees and migrants and does not take into account the voluntary nature of responsibility sharing. The representative of the Russian Federation, while emphasizing the importance of burden-sharing to ensure international solidarity in addressing refugee issues, stressed that the agreement is not binding and therefore does not impose any legal obligation on his country.

Covering a range of human rights issues — from the rights of children, women, peasants and indigenous peoples, to promoting fundamental freedoms of religion, peaceful assembly and free association — the Assembly adopted most resolutions without a vote, including an inaugural text on combating trafficking in human organs, as a “novel” approach to crime prevention that addresses three perspectives on which such crimes should be analysed: human rights, health and criminal justice.

By its terms, the Assembly urged States to ensure that the removal and transplantation of human organs exclusively take place in centres authorized by national health authorities, as well as to enhance regulatory oversight and establish data registries on each organ recovery and transplant procedure.

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The Global Compact on Refugees is a positive step toward a better refugee response
17.12.2018
International Rescue Committee, Oxfam, Save the Children, Norwegian Refugee Council and Danish Refugee Council welcome the affirmation of the Global Compact on Refugees today. The Compact has the potential to provide better protection and care for refugees and development benefits to hosting communities.

With the UN General Assembly vote in New York, an overwhelming majority of UN Member States affirmed a pact of international solidarity and cooperation for refugee protection and host community development.

Starting in 2019, significant progress can be achieved if States take immediate action to deliver on the promised changes to improve conditions for people fleeing war, persecution and environmental degradation, and address the concerns of the communities hosting them.

As key partners in achieving the objectives laid out in the Global Compact on Refugees (GCR) we see five key areas: equitable responsibility-sharing; holding ourselves and States accountable to progress; enhancing the leadership of affected communities in designing the response; strengthening protection and coping strategies for people of concern; and delivering real solutions to end their displacement. By focusing on the following five areas we can collectively achieve the objectives of the Global Compact on Refugees.

Progress towards equitable responsibility-sharing is key. Jan Egeland, Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council, calls for States to prepare concrete pledges at the 2019 Global Refugee Forum: “The responsibility for hosting refugees is now primarily shouldered by a few low- and middle-income countries close to war zones. The most affluent nations are neither receiving refugees nor supporting host nations in any significant way. We need real responsibility sharing from all rich nations, so that refugee crises can be managed. All countries must do their share,” says Egeland.

Accountability is necessary for a non-binding document and 2019 must be the year where ambitious benchmarks for the success of the Compact are defined: “It is shocking that we still have no systematic way to assess progress on refugee outcomes nor the billions provided to assist them. Three years after the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, we know refugees are being left behind” says David Miliband, President of the International Rescue Committee. “Accountability and commitment to what works must be at the center of the Compact’s implementation. The establishment of the World Bank-UNHCR Joint Data Centre is a good first step, but it is critical that we agree clear metrics on outcomes and gather better data to drive real improvements in the lives of refugees and their hosts.”

Enhanced voice and leadership of the people concerned must also be a concrete result of the Compact already in 2019: “As world leaders come together to affirm the Global Compact on Refugees, the opportunity for the people most affected by displacement to build a better, fairer system that reflects their needs must not be lost. We must ensure direct and meaningful participation from refugees and host communities in the implementation of the Compact, as they are experts on their own needs, agents for their families and communities, and indispensable leaders for change,” said Winnie Byanyima, Oxfam International Executive Director.

Also, we expect to see real changes in the lives of refugees and hosting communities. We need to work collectively to realise the potential of the Compact to deliver better refugee protection in practice. Helle Thorning-Schmidt, Chief Executive Officer for Save the Children International says: “This historic agreement offers us the chance to make a real difference to the lives of refugees. Refugee children make up half of all refugees, and they are always the most vulnerable. We hope this Compact will help protect these children and give them the future they have the right to. What refugee children tell us they want most of all is an education. So we are delighted that the Compact pledges that all refugee children will be in school and learning within a few months of crossing an international border and that funding should be provided to enable this, particularly support for host countries. There is no time to waste to make this promise a reality for refugee children.”

Lastly, it is critical that the Compact results in expanded solutions for refugees: “In 2019, we must start using the Global Compact on Refugees to expand access to durable solutions not least in protracted displacement situations. The Compact sets a standard keeping us all accountable to increased resettlement, to ensure that all returns are safe and dignified, and to include, empower and engage refugees where ever they are. To that end, it is essential that the Global Refugee Forum becomes a forum for action – not for talking” says Christian Friis Bach, Secretary General of the Danish Refugee Council.

While we are disappointed that the US and Hungary have chosen not to affirm the Global Compact on Refugees, we remain optimistic and open to continued dialogue with them as the agreement is implemented.

Following today’s positive step toward a better refugee response, the International Rescue Committee, Oxfam, Save the Children, Norwegian Refugee Council and Danish Refugee Council urge States to ensure a truly global application of the Global Compact on Refugees. Millions of refugees and host community members expect a better future; and the Compact must and can deliver it.

WHO launches technical guidance series on the health of refugees and migrants

WHO launches technical guidance series on the health of refugees and migrants
18-12-2018
WHO is marking International Migrants Day on 18 December 2018 with the launch of a technical guidance series on the health of refugees and migrants. Produced in collaboration with the European Commission, each publication addresses a specific aspect of the health of refugees and migrants by providing tools, case studies and evidence to inform practices and policies to improve their health.

Five publications are currently available, each with a special focus on one of the following:
:: children’s health;
:: health promotion;
:: healthy ageing;
:: maternal and newborn health; and
:: mental health.

This technical guidance series complements the forthcoming “Report on the health of refugees and migrants in the WHO European Region”, which will be published online in the first quarter of 2019.

Health of refugee and migrant children
When considering health and health-care interventions for migrant children, areas that need specific attention include their diverse backgrounds, whether they are unaccompanied and separated from family, whether they have been trafficked, and whether they have been left behind.

This technical guidance presents policy considerations for promoting refugee and migrant children’s health and well-being, and particularly their mental health. It includes an intersectoral approach that targets risk factors at the individual, family and community levels. It emphasizes the important role of national/local governments in fostering or hindering equitable living conditions for refugee and migrant children in the areas of housing, health-care services and education.

Health promotion for improved refugee and migrant health
This technical guidance outlines current best practices, evidence and knowledge to inform policy and programme development in the area of health promotion for refugees and migrants in the WHO European Region. It highlights key principles, summarizes priority actions and challenges, maps available resources and tools, and provides policy considerations and practical recommendations to improve health promotion activities.

Health of older refugees and migrants
Population ageing caused by consistently low birth rates and increased life expectancy is a major current trend across Europe. This technical guidance aims to inform the development of policies and practices related to improving the health of older refugees and migrants.
Both ageing and migration are in themselves complex, multidimensional processes shaped by a range of factors over the life-course of the individual. Responding to the needs of older refugees and migrants, therefore, must be integrated into all dimensions of policies and practices related to ageing.

Improving the health care of pregnant refugee and migrant women and newborn children
Being a migrant can be considered a risk factor for poorer maternal and newborn health outcomes. This technical guidance identifies problems and entry points for interventions for maternal and newborn health among refugees and migrants in the Region.

It outlines policy considerations for 4 main areas affecting refugee and migrant maternal and newborn health:
:: individual health status;
:: accessibility of health care;
:: quality of care; and
:: health-care policy and financing systems.

Mental health promotion and mental health care in refugees and migrants
The complexity and stress of migration are related to events before departure, during travel and transit, and after arrival. Consequently, refugees and migrants can suffer from mental disorders, although prevalence is highly variable across studies and population groups.

This technical guidance reviews the prevalence of some disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and depressive and anxiety disorders. Based on the best available evidence regarding risk factors and areas for intervention, it identifies 8 priority action areas for consideration by policy-makers regarding the mental health of refugees and migrants.

Health of refugee and migrant children (2018)
Health promotion for improved refugee and migrant health (2018)
Health of older refugees and migrants (2018)
Improving the health care of pregnant refugee and migrant women and newborn children (2018)
Mental health promotion and mental health care in refugees and migrants (2018)
News – Global migration pact to ensure fundamental human rights for migrants in all policies and practices

Safe Pathways for Refugees – OECD-UNHCR Study

Safe Pathways for Refugees
OECD-UNHCR Study on third country solutions for refugees: family reunification, study programmes and labour mobility
December 2018 :: 48 pages

.
Press Release
More refugees being helped by family, work and study permits, finds OECD and UNHCR study
18/12/2018
Data released today shows that OECD countries have admitted more people from major refugee source countries on non-humanitarian permits than through resettlement schemes in the last eight years.

A study by the OECD and UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, titled “Safe Pathways for Refugees” shows that more than 560,000 people from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia and Eritrea entered OECD countries through family, work and study permits in an eight-year period.

This compares to 350,400 from the five countries who arrived within the same period through resettlement schemes.

These figures do not include people from those five refugee populations who have been granted refugee status or humanitarian permits through national asylum systems and procedures. These amount to 1.5 million in the same period, highlighting the critical importance of fair and efficient national asylum systems

Of all the non-humanitarian entry permits issued by OECD nations to people from the five refugee source countries, family permits account for 86 per cent, followed by student permits (10 per cent) and work permits (four per cent).

“While these pathways are not a substitute for resettlement, they can complement humanitarian programmes by facilitating safe and legal entry for refugees to other countries. Not only can this help mitigate refugees having to resort to dangerous journeys, it will also go some way towards alleviating the strains on major refugee hosting nations,” said UNHCR’s Assistant High Commissioner for Protection, Volker Türk.

This study is the first, comprehensive mapping exercise of its kind, building on the commitments made by the international community in the 2016 New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants to improve data collection on resettlement and other pathways for admission of refugees.

“In the current global context of large-scale refugee flows and forced displacement, alternative pathways —family, study and work permits — can play an important contribution. It is hoped that this evidence base can help states further scale up predictable, sustainable and protection-sensitive admission systems,” said Stefano Scarpetta, OECD’s Director for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs.

With developing regions hosting 85 per cent of the world’s refugees, or 16.9 million people, ensuring a more timely, equitable and predictable sharing of responsibilities by increasing access for refugees to move to third countries is a key objective of the Global Compact on Refugees.

Findings from this report will support the development of a three-year strategy envisaged by the Global Compact on Refugees to expand resettlement and complementary pathways.

Data in the report will also be updated on a regular basis, with the report intended to be issued by UNHCR and OECD every two years.

Emergencies

Emergencies

POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)
Polio this week as of 18 December 2018 [GPEI]
:: Featured on http://www.polioeradication.org:  interview with Jean- Marc Olivé, Chairman of the Technical Advisory Group, on what needs to be done to end polio in the Horn of Africa; Djibouti carried out a successful round of National Immunization Days (NIDs) since 2015 to avoid risk of polio virus importation.

Summary of new viruses this week:
Afghanistan –WPV1-positive environmental samples;
Pakistan – seven WPV1-positive environmental samples;
Nigeria – one cVDPV2 AFP case and three cVDPV2-positive environmental samples.
 

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Editor’s Note:
WHO has posted a refreshed emergencies page which presents an updated listing of Grade 3,2,1 emergencies as below.

WHO Grade 3 Emergencies  [to 22 Dec 2018]
Democratic Republic of the Congo
:: 20: Situation report on the Ebola outbreak in North Kivu  18 December 2018
:: DONs Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo  20 December 2018

[See Milestones above for more detail]

Bangladesh – Rohingya crisis
:: Weekly Situation Report 55 – 13 December 2018
[Excerpt]
Highlights
:: The fourth round of oral cholera vaccination (OCV) campaign was completed with 108% coverage. A total of 356,202 people received vaccination.
:: A total of three new diphtheria case-patients (three suspected) were reported this week. Total case-patients reported in EWARS is now 8,327. 

Syrian Arab Republic
:: Cancer treatment in Syria improves following State of Kuwait donation  19 December 2018

Yemen
:: WHO enhances access to basic health care in Yemen  17 December 2018

Myanmar – No new announcements identified
Nigeria – No new announcements identified
Somalia – No new announcements identified
South Sudan – No new announcements identified

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WHO Grade 2 Emergencies  [to 22 Dec 2018]
Iraq
:: Italy supports physical and mental health services in Ninewa   Baghdad 18 December

Brazil (in Portugese) – No new announcements identified
Cameroon  – No new announcements identified
Central African Republic  – No new announcements identified
Ethiopia – No new announcements identified
Hurricane Irma and Maria in the Caribbean – No new announcements identified
occupied Palestinian territory – No new announcements identified
Libya – No new announcements identified
MERS-CoV – No new announcements identified
Niger – No new announcements identified
Sao Tome and Principe Necrotizing Cellulitis (2017) – No new announcements identified
Sudan – No new announcements identified
Ukraine – No new announcements identified
Zimbabwe – No new announcements identified

WHO-AFRO: Outbreaks and Emergencies Bulletin, Week 49: 08-14 December 2018
The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 57 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key ongoing events, including:
:: Lassa fever in Benin
:: Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
:: Yellow fever in Nigeria
::Measles in Madagascar.

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WHO Grade 1 Emergencies  [to 22 Dec 2018]
Afghanistan
Chad
Indonesia – Sulawesi earthquake 2018
Kenya
Lao People’s Democratic Republic
Mali
Namibia – viral hepatitis
Peru
Philippines – Tyhpoon Mangkhut
Tanzania

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UN OCHA – L3 Emergencies
The UN and its humanitarian partners are currently responding to three ‘L3’ emergencies. This is the global humanitarian system’s classification for the response to the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises. 
Yemen
:: Yemen Humanitarian Update Covering 1 – 13 December 2018 | Issue 34

Key Issues
:: Recent IPC analysis indicates that over 20 million face severe food insecurity in Yemen.
:: The upsurge in Yemen’s migrant arrivals exceeds 2018 arrivals to Europe via the Mediterranean Seaw.
:: Polio campaign reaches 4.6 million children, 84 per cent of target.
:: The trend of suspected cholera cases remains stable.

Syrian Arab Republic   
:: Syria Crisis: Northeast Syria Situation Report No. 30 (1 November – 14 December 2018)
:: Fact Sheet: United Nations Cross-border Operations from Turkey to Syria | as of 30 November 2018 [EN/AR] Published on 17 Dec 2018

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UN OCHA – Corporate Emergencies
When the USG/ERC declares a Corporate Emergency Response, all OCHA offices, branches and sections provide their full support to response activities both at HQ and in the field.
Ethiopia  No new announcements identified.
Somalia  – No new announcements identified.

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“Other Emergencies”
Indonesia: Central Sulawesi EarthquakeNo new announcements identified.

 

The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 15 December 2018

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDF: The Sentinel_ period ending 15 Dec 2018

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles and abstracts from 100+ peer-reviewed journals  [see PDF]