COVID-19: Resource Hubs, Portals, Special Collections
Number One :: 31 March 2020

GE2P2 Global Foundation
Center for Disaster & Humanitarian Ethics

Editor
Steven Martin, MPhil
Senior Researcher
GE2P2 Global Foundation
steven.martin@ge2p2global.org

PDF: The Sentinel – Special Bulletin_COVID-19 Resources_Version 1-0_31 March 2020

 

As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads, a range of organizations globally have launched portals, resource pages, and digital collections of guidance, recommendations, resources, and other content. Our initial inventory presented below will be refreshed regularly as we anticipate that these resources will grow in number and depth.

At the global health governance/guidance level, the World Health Organization has launched a portal which includes authoritative daily situation reports and press briefings, updates on R&D for medicines and vaccines, country and technical guidance, travel advice and more.

Other UN agencies have launched resource collections focused to their remits including UNICEF for children’s issues, including guidance on strengthening protection measures for children during pandemic. Joint guidance from IFRC, UNICEF and WHO includes practical actions and checklists for administrators, teachers, parents and children. UNESCO has published [in Spanish] ethical guidelines for the conduct of research during the COVID-19 pandemic. The World Organisation for Animal Health and the World Veterinary Association issued a joint statement addressing the roles and responsibilities of the veterinary profession for public health in the pandemic.

Also at global level, the Global Fund has issued guidance on the pandemic’s impact on supply chain logistics involving health products. Given that robust risk management processes in medical laboratories are the best defense against errors and false results, ISO has updated ISO 22367, the relevant international standard.

At the multilateral level, the OECD’s Tackling the coronavirus [COVID-19] resource collates key impacts, country profiles, data, videos, policy responses, resources and real-time data. The European Commission has made available relevant standards for medical supplies to facilitate increases in production.

In the human rights space, Freedom House has produced guidelines for protecting democracy and political rights in the context of COVID-19. Similarly, Human Rights Watch has outlined concerns posed by the coronavirus outbreak, drawing on examples of government responses to date, and recommends ways governments and other actors can respect human rights in their response. ISPCAN has drawn together resources for child protection professionals.

In the humanitarian response sector, Elrha has launched and will continue to update Coronavirus (COVID-19): Resources for humanitarians which will capture content which supports response efforts from a range of organizations. Disaster ready provides access to a collection of free resources from reputable health organizations such as WHO, CDC, KonTerra to help responders of COVID-19 to work safely and promote infection prevention, preparedness and well-being during this pandemic. Evidence Aid is compiling links to entry points for this literature and features Italian and Japanese guidelines on COVID-19. ALNAP’s COVID-19 Response Portal features a collection of guidelines, tools, papers and lessons learnt which are relevant to responding to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Sphere has also issues guidance based on humanitarian standards, applying humanitarian standards to fight COVID-19. The CHS Alliance sets out a principled and people-centered approach management, response and adaptation to COVID-19 aligned with the Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability (CHS). ICRC has published guidance on inclusive programming during coronavirus. The IASC has identified identify specific challenges and vulnerabilities that must be taken into consideration in camps and camp-like settings.

Ethical analysis and resources are being aggregated by The Hastings Center including guidance, tools, and resources for Hospital Ethics Committees (HECs) and Clinical Ethics Consultation (CEC), and an Ethical Framework for Health Care Institutions & Guidelines for Institutional Ethics Services Responding to the Coronavirus Pandemic.

The philanthropic/donor sector response to the coronavirus outbreak.is being served by a resource maintained by the Council on Foundations.

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Below is an alphabetical list for easy navigation, and a more extended listing with titles and links:

ALNAP (The COVID-19 Response Portal)
CHS Alliance https://www.chsalliance.org/get-support/article/covid-19-and-the-chs/
Council on Foundations (COVID-19 Resource Hub).
Disaster ready (Coronavirus (COVID-19)
European Commission (Coronavirus: European standards for medical supplies made freely available to facilitate increase of production).
Evidence Aid (Coronavirus resources)
Freedom House (https://freedomhouse.org/article/principles-protecting-civil-and-political-rights-fight-against-covid-19) and (https://freedomhouse.org/article/freedom-house-offers-guidelines-protecting-democracy-during-pandemic)
Global Fund (COVID-19 Impact on Supply Chain Logistics: Assessment and Recommendations).
Hastings Center (COVID-19: Supporting Ethical Care and Responding to Moral Distress in a Public Health Emergency). and (https://www.thehastingscenter.org/ethicalframeworkcovid19/)
Human Rights Watch (https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/03/19/human-rights-dimensions-covid-19-response)
IASC (https://interagencystandingcommittee.org/other/interim-guidance-scaling-covid-19-outbreak-readiness-and-response-operations-camps-and-camp )
ICRC (https://www.icrc.org/en/document/covid-19-coronavirus-inclusive-programming)
ISAC (https://interagencystandingcommittee.org/other/interim-guidance-scaling-covid-19-outbreak-readiness-and-response-operations-camps-and-camp)
ISO (Reducing the risk of errors in medical laboratories with updated International Standard).
ISPCAN (ISPCAN’S RECOMMENDATIONS ON COVID-19)
OECD (Tackling the coronavirus (COVID-19))
SPHERE (https://spherestandards.org/coronavirus/)
UNESCO (https://en.unesco.org/news/ethics-research-times-pandemic-covid-19)
UNICEF (COVID-19: Children at heightened risk of abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence amidst intensifying containment measures) (COVID-19: IFRC, UNICEF and WHO issue guidance to protect children and support safe school operations)
WHO https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019
World Organisation for Animal Health and the World Veterinary Association (WVA) (COVID-19 and veterinary activities designated as essential)

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ALNAP [to 28 Mar 2020]
The COVID-19 Response Portal
This portal holds a vast collection of guidelines, tools, papers and lessons learnt from across and beyond the ALNAP Membership which are relevant to responding to the current COVID-19 pandemic.

CHS Alliance [to 28 Mar 2020]
26 March 2020
COVID-19 and the Core Humanitarian Standard: How to meet our CHS commitments in the coronavirus pandemic
The Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability (CHS) sets out our sector’s core commitments to the people we assist. It guides us in taking a principled and people-centred approach to the way we manage the response and adaptation to COVID-19. This is a guide to how the CHS commitments can inform your response to the pandemic, along with some useful resources…

Council on Foundations [to 28 Mar 2020]
Council Resources for Responding to COVID-19
Council resources for foundations responding to Coronavirus (COVID-19).

U.S. Government Action on COVID-19
Stay up-to-date on the latest legislation and government actions in the United States concerning COVID-19.

COVID-19 Resource Hub
Resources and news for philanthropy’s response to the coronavirus outbreak.

Disaster ready [to 28 Mar 2020]
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Learning Resources
Collection of free resources from reputable health organizations such as WHO, CDC, KonTerra, and EJ4 will help responders of COVID-19 to work safely and promote infection prevention, preparedness and well-being during this pandemic

European Commission [to 28 Mar 2020]
Coronavirus: European standards for medical supplies made freely available to facilitate increase of production
Upon the urgent request of the Commission, CEN and CENELEC, in collaboration with all their members, have agreed to immediately make available a number of European standards for certain medical devices and personal protective equipment.

Evidence Aid [to 28 Mar 2020]
Italian guidelines on Novel Coronavirus
Created on 29 February 2020. Last updated 29 February 2020. Compiled by colleagues at the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group in Italy

Japanese guidelines on Novel Coronavirus
Created on 26 February 2020. Last updated 26 February 2020. Compiled by colleagues at Bukkyo University, co-ordinated by Prof. Hajime Takeuchi MD. A. Guidelines issued by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan.

Coronavirus resources
Claire Allen
The outbreak of the Coronavirus is leading to a rapidly expanding and evolving literature. Evidence Aid is compiling links to entry points for this literature and will include these on this web page. If you have any suggestions for other resources that we might consider linking to, please let us know.

Freedom House [to 28 Mar 2020]
Freedom House Offers Guidelines for Protecting Democracy during Pandemic opens in new tab
Press release
March 24, 2020

Principles for Protecting Civil and Political Rights in the Fight against Covid-19 opens in new tab
Perspectives
March 24, 2020

Global Fund [to 28 Mar 2020]
COVID-19 Impact on Supply Chain Logistics: Assessment and Recommendations
12 March 2020

The Hastings Center [to 28 Mar 2020]
COVID-19: Supporting Ethical Care and Responding to Moral Distress in a Public Health Emergency
Guidance, tools, and resources for Hospital Ethics Committees (HECs) Clinical Ethics Consultation (CEC)

Ethical Framework for Health Care Institutions Responding to Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19)
Guidelines for Institutional Ethics Services Responding to COVID-19. Ethical Framework for Health Care Institutions & Guidelines for Institutional Ethics Services Responding to the Coronavirus Pandemic.

Human Rights Watch [to 28 Mar 2020]
Human Rights Dimensions of COVID-19 Response
March 19, 2020
This document provides an overview of human rights concerns posed by the coronavirus outbreak, drawing on examples of government responses to date, and recommends ways governments and other actors can respect human rights in their response.

ICRC [to 28 Mar 2020]
COVID-19: Inclusive programming during the time of coronavirus
This paper brings together guidance and messages from the ICRC’s Operations Diversity Inclusion, Sexual Violence and Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse teams, in collaboration with the Global Adviser on Children.
27-03-2020 | Article

IFRC [to 28 Mar 2020]
COVID-19: IFRC, UNICEF and WHO issue guidance to protect children and support safe school operations
GENEVA/NEW YORK, 10 March 2020 – The International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO) today issued new guidance to help protect children and schools from transmission of the COV …

IOM / International Organization for Migration [to 28 Mar 2020]
IOM Joins Global Response to Prevent the Spread, Mitigate the Impact of COVID-19 on Crisis-Affected Communities
2020-03-25 16:52
Geneva – Today (25 March) the International Organization for Migration (IOM) is joining the health and humanitarian community to launch the interagency COVID-19 Global Humanitarian…

ISAC [to 28 Mar 2020]
Interim Guidance on Scaling-up COVID-19 Outbreak in Readiness and Response Operations in Camps and Camp-like Settings (jointly developed by IFRC, IOM, UNHCR and WHO)
People affected by humanitarian crises, particularly those displaced and/or living in camps and camp-like settings, are often faced with specific challenges and vulnerabilities that must be taken into consideration when planning for readiness and response operations for the COVID-19 outbreak.

ISPCAN [to 28 Mar 2020]
ISPCAN’S RECOMMENDATIONS ON COVID-19
ISPCAN is committed to providing support to individuals, caregivers, and professionals as they navigate through the COVID 19 pandemic by providing up-to-date resources in collaboration with our partner organizations around the globe. We have gathered resources on this topic and want our members to also share.

OECD [to 28 Mar 2020]
Tackling the coronavirus (COVID-19)
What are the impacts and consequences of the coronavirus pandemic on our lives and our societies – and what are some of the solutions we can find to boost our healthcare systems, secure our businesses, maintain our jobs and education, and stabilise financial markets and economies?

OIE [to 28 Mar 2020]
COVID-19 and veterinary activities designated as essential
Joint Statement by the World Organisation for Animal Health and World Veterinary Association
In the framework of the COVID-19 pandemic, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Veterinary Association (WVA) jointly draw attention to the roles and responsibilities of the veterinary profession for public health. They highlight the specific veterinary activities which are key to ensure a continuum in food safety, disease prevention and emergency management.

SPHERE [to 28 Mar 2020]
COVID-19 guidance based on humanitarian standards
COVID-19 guidance based on humanitarian standards, applying humanitarian standards to fight COVID-19. The guidance can be download in multiple languages.

UNESCO [to 28 Mar 2020]
Ethics in research in times of pandemic COVID-19
The Covid-19 pandemic has arrived in Latin America and the Caribbean and with it the certain possibility that various types of related biomedical research will be carried out on vulnerable populations in the region.
26/03/2020

WHO [to 28 Mar 2020]
Daily WHO situation reports here: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports

Daily WHO press briefings here: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/media-resources/press-briefings

COVID-19: IFRC, UNICEF and WHO issue guidance to protect children and support safe school operations
Guidance includes practical actions and checklists for administrators, teachers, parents and children
10 March 2020

WHO: Guiding principles for immunization activities during the COVID-19 pandemic
Interim guidance – 26 March 2020
This document provides guiding principles and considerations to support countries in their decision-making regarding provision of immunization services during the COVID-19 pandemic and is endorsed by the WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization.

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 28 March 2020 :: Number 310

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDF:The Sentinel_ period ending 28 Mar 2020

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles and abstracts from 100+ peer-reviewed journals  [see PDF]

Secretary-General Calls for Global Ceasefire, Citing War-Ravaged Health Systems, Populations Most Vulnerable to Novel Coronavirus

COVID-19 :: “Global Ceasefire”

Secretary-General Calls for Global Ceasefire, Citing War-Ravaged Health Systems, Populations Most Vulnerable to Novel Coronavirus
23 March 2020 SG/SM/20018
Following is UN Secretary-General António Guterres’ appeal for a global ceasefire amid the COVID-19 pandemic, issued today in New York:

Our world faces a common enemy: COVID-19. The virus does not care about nationality or ethnicity, faction or faith. It attacks all, relentlessly.

Meanwhile, armed conflict rages on around the world. The most vulnerable — women and children, people with disabilities, the marginalized and the displaced — pay the highest price. They are also at the highest risk of suffering devastating losses from COVID-19.

Let’s not forget that in war-ravaged countries, health systems have collapsed. Health professionals, already few in number, have often been targeted. Refugees and others displaced by violent conflict are doubly vulnerable.

The fury of the virus illustrates the folly of war.

That is why today, I am calling for an immediate global ceasefire in all corners of the world. It is time to put armed conflict on lockdown and focus together on the true fight of our lives.

To warring parties, I say: Pull back from hostilities. Put aside mistrust and animosity. Silence the guns, stop the artillery, end the airstrikes.

This is crucial — to help create corridors for life-saving aid. To open precious windows for diplomacy. To bring hope to places among the most vulnerable to COVID-19.

Let us take inspiration from coalitions and dialogue slowly taking shape among rival parties to enable joint approaches to COVID-19. But we need much more.

End the sickness of war and fight the disease that is ravaging our world. It starts by stopping the fighting everywhere. Now. That is what our human family needs, now more than ever.

Remarks by IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva During an Extraordinary G20 Leaders’ Summit

COVID-19 :: G20

Remarks by IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva During an Extraordinary G20 Leaders’ Summit
March 26, 2020
International Monetary Fund Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva made the following statement today following a conference call of G20 Leaders’ Summit:
“I am grateful to the Saudi presidency for calling this extraordinary summit – so we can close ranks as a global community to protect people’s lives and guard the world economy. We project a contraction of global output in 2020, and recovery in 2021. How deep the contraction and how fast the recovery depends on the speed of containment of the pandemic and on how strong and coordinated our monetary and fiscal policy actions are.

“You, the G20 leaders, have already taken extraordinary steps to save lives and safeguard your economies.

“Particularly critical is the targeted fiscal support to vulnerable households and to large and small businesses, so they can stay afloat and get quickly back to work. Otherwise it will take years to overcome the effects of widespread bankruptcies and layoffs.

“Such support will accelerate the eventual recovery, and put us in a better condition to tackle challenges such as debt overhangs and disrupted trade flows.

“And it is paramount we recognize the importance of supporting emerging market and developing economies to overcome the brunt of the crisis and help restore growth. They find themselves particularly hard hit by a combination of health crisis, sudden stop of the world economy, capital flight to safety, and – for some – sharp drop in commodity prices. These countries are the main focus of our attention. We have a considerable, $1 trillion strong, financial capacity to place in their defense, working closely with the World Bank and other International Financial Institutions (IFIs).

The challenge though is enormous:
:: Exceptionally large number of countries simultaneously require IMF emergency financing.
:: Emerging markets are dramatically impacted by record high capital outflows and severe shortage of FX liquidity
:: Many low income countries step into this crisis under a high burden of debt.

“We must act at par with the magnitude of the challenge. For us at the IMF it means working with you to make our crisis response even stronger. For this we ask your backing to:
:: Double our emergency financing capacity.
:: Boost global liquidity through a sizeable SDR (Special Drawing Right) allocation, as we successfully did during the 2009 global crisis and by expanding the use of swap type facilities at the Fund
:: Support action of official bilateral creditors to ease the debt burden of our poorest members during the times of global downturn.

“We will get through this crisis together. Together we will lay the ground for a faster and stronger recovery.”

A global approach is the only way to fight COVID-19, the UN says as it launches humanitarian response plan

COVID-19 :: UN Funding Appeal – USD$2 billion

A global approach is the only way to fight COVID-19, the UN says as it launches humanitarian response plan
OCHA 25 March 2020
:: UN humanitarian chief warns that failing to help vulnerable countries fight the coronavirus now could place millions at risk and leave the virus free to circle back around the globe.
:: UN launches US$2 billion global humanitarian response to fight COVID-19 across South America, Africa, the Middle East and Asia.
:: Governments urged to commit to fully supporting the global humanitarian response plan, while sustaining funding to existing humanitarian appeals.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres today [Wednesday, 25 March] launched a $2 billion coordinated global humanitarian response plan to fight COVID-19 in some of the world’s most vulnerable countries in a bid to protect millions of people and stop the virus from circling back around the globe.

COVID-19 has killed more than 16,000 people worldwide and there are nearly 400,000 reported cases. It has a foothold across the globe and is now reaching countries that were already facing humanitarian crisis because of conflict, natural disasters and climate change.

The response plan will be implemented by UN agencies, with international NGOs and NGO consortia playing a direct role in the response. It will:
:: deliver essential laboratory equipment to test for the virus, and medical supplies to treat people;
:: install handwashing stations in camps and settlements;
:: launch public information campaigns on how to protect yourself and others from the virus; and
:: establish airbridges and hubs across Africa, Asia and Latin America to move humanitarian workers and supplies to where they are needed most.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres said:
“COVID-19 is menacing the whole of humanity – and so the whole of humanity must fight back. Individual country responses are not going to be enough. “We must come to the aid of the ultra-vulnerable – millions upon millions of people who are least able to protect themselves. This is a matter of basic human solidarity. It is also crucial for combating the virus. This is the moment to step up for the vulnerable.”

Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Mark Lowcock said:
“COVID-19 has already upended life in some of the world’s wealthiest countries. It is now reaching places where people live in warzones, cannot easily access clean water and soap, and have no hope of a hospital bed if they fall critically ill.

“To leave the world’s poorest and most vulnerable countries to their fate would be both cruel and unwise. If we leave coronavirus to spread freely in these places, we would be placing millions at high risk, whole regions will be tipped into chaos and the virus will have the opportunity to circle back around the globe.

“Countries battling the pandemic at home are rightly prioritizing people living in their own communities. But the hard truth is they will be failing to protect their own people if they do not act now to help the poorest countries protect themselves.

“Our priority is to help these countries prepare and continue helping the millions who rely on humanitarian assistance from the UN to survive. Properly funded, our global response effort will equip humanitarian organizations with the tools to fight the virus, save lives, and help contain the spread of COVID-19 worldwide.”…

Urgent action needed to prevent COVID-19 “rampaging through places of detention” – Bachelet

COVID-19 :: Detention

Urgent action needed to prevent COVID-19 “rampaging through places of detention” – Bachelet
GENEVA (25 March 2020) – UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet has called on governments to take urgent action to protect the health and safety of people in detention and other closed facilities, as part of overall efforts to contain the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Covid-19 has begun to strike prisons, jails and immigration detention centres, as well as residential care homes and psychiatric hospitals, and risks rampaging through such institutions’ extremely vulnerable populations,” said Bachelet.

“In many countries, detention facilities are overcrowded, in some cases dangerously so. People are often held in unhygienic conditions and health services are inadequate or even non-existent. Physical distancing and self-isolation in such conditions are practically impossible,” she added.

“Governments are facing huge demands on resources in this crisis and are having to take difficult decisions. But I urge them not to forget those behind bars, or those confined in places such as closed mental health facilities, nursing homes and orphanages, because the consequences of neglecting them are potentially catastrophic,” the High Commissioner said.

“It is vital that governments should address the situation of detained people in their crisis planning to protect detainees, staff, visitors and of course wider society,” she added.

“With outbreaks of the disease, and an increasing number of deaths, already reported in prisons and other institutions in an expanding number of countries, authorities should act now to prevent further loss of life among detainees and staff,” Bachelet said.

The High Commissioner urged governments and relevant authorities to work quickly to reduce the number of people in detention, noting several countries have already undertaken some positive actions. Authorities should examine ways to release those particularly vulnerable to COVID-19, among them older detainees and those who are sick, as well as low-risk offenders. They should also continue to provide for the specific health-care requirements of women prisoners, including those who are pregnant, as well as those of inmates with disabilities and of juvenile detainees.

“Now, more than ever, governments should release every person detained without sufficient legal basis, including political prisoners and others detained simply for expressing critical or dissenting views,” Bachelet stressed.

When people are released, they should be medically screened and measures taken to ensure that if needed they receive care and proper follow-up, including health monitoring.

“Under international human rights law, States have an obligation to take steps to prevent foreseeable threats to public health and have a duty to ensure that all who need vital medical care can receive it,” Bachelet said.

For those in detention, the State has a particular duty to protect inmates’ physical and mental health and well-being, as set out by the UN Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (also known as the Nelson Mandela Rules).

Measures taken amid a health crisis should not undermine the fundamental rights of detained people, including their rights to adequate food and water. Safeguards against ill-treatment of people in custody, including access to a lawyer and doctor, should also be fully respected.

“Restrictions on visits to closed institutions may be required to help prevent COVID-19 outbreaks, but such steps need to be introduced in a transparent way and communicated clearly to those affected. Suddenly halting contact with the outside world risks aggravating what may be tense, difficult and potentially dangerous situations,” Bachelet said. She noted examples of alternative measures taken in some countries, such as setting up expanded videoconferencing, allowing increased phone calls with family members and permitting email.

“COVID-19 poses a huge challenge to the whole of society, as governments take steps to enforce physical distancing. It is vital such measures are upheld, but I am deeply concerned that some countries are threatening to impose prison sentences for those who fail to obey. This is likely to exacerbate the grave situation in prisons and do little to halt the disease’s spread,” Bachelet warned.
“Imprisonment should be a measure of last resort, particularly during this crisis.”

Interim Guidance on Scaling-up COVID-19 Outbreak in Readiness and Response Operations in Camps and Camp-like Settings

COVID-19 :: Camps

Interim Guidance on Scaling-up COVID-19 Outbreak in Readiness and Response Operations in Camps and Camp-like Settings (jointly developed by IFRC, IOM, UNHCR and WHO)
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2020
People affected by humanitarian crises, particularly those displaced and/or living in camps and camp-like settings, are often faced with specific challenges and vulnerabilities that must be taken into consideration when planning for readiness and response operations for the COVID-19 outbreak. They are frequently neglected, stigmatized, and may face difficulties in accessing health services that are otherwise available to the general population. In the context of this Interim Guidance, the people in humanitarian situations affected by this guidance may include internally displaced persons (IDPs), host communities, asylum seekers, refugees and returnees, and migrants when in similar situations. While further adaptations might be needed for some population groups, including those living in slums this interim guidance is issued to assist field staff to immediately respond to urgent needs.