The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 21 November 2020 :: Number 342

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDFThe Sentinel_ period ending 21 Nov 2020

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles

IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva Urges G20 Leaders to Jointly Build the Foundations of a Better 21st Century Global Economy

COVID-19 – Economic Recovery

IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva Urges G20 Leaders to Jointly Build the Foundations of a Better 21st Century Global Economy
November 22, 2020
Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva made the following statement today following a virtual meeting of G20 Leaders’ Summit:

“During our meeting, I commended the G20 countries as a whole for taking unprecedented actions to mitigate the impact of COVID19—including fiscal and monetary measures–that have helped to prevent massive bankruptcies and an even deeper crisis.

“The Debt Service Suspension Initiative, in particular, gave many poor countries much needed temporary ‘breathing space’. The Common Framework for Debt Treatments beyond the DSSI, endorsed by G20 Leaders at this meeting, will allow low-income countries with unsustainable debts to apply for permanent debt relief on a case-by-case basis, with a level playing field for creditors. It is critical to operationalize this Framework promptly and effectively. Going forward, we must also help those countries not covered by the Framework to address debt vulnerabilities so that their economies can become more resilient.”

“I thanked the G20 for their support to the IMF, which has enabled us to deliver over US$100 billion in new financing to 82 countries and debt service relief for our poorest members. I also emphasized that the world is not out of the woods yet in terms of this crisis.

Cooperation is going to be even more important going forward on three priority fronts:

First, end the health crisis. With vaccines on the horizon, we must ensure they reach everyone, everywhere. If we do this, the Fund estimates that it could add almost US$ 9 trillion to global income by 2025. There could be no better value for money—or for the world.

Second, reinforce the economic bridge to recovery. It is essential to sustain support to businesses and workers until we exit the health crisis—there must be no premature withdrawal. It is also time now to prepare for a synchronized green and digital infrastructure investment push to invigorate growth, to limit scarring, and address climate goals. If G20 countries act together, they can achieve two-thirds more at the same cost than if each country acts alone.

Third, build the foundations of a better 21st Century global economy. The most consequential uncertainty facing us today is how we can use the momentum of disruption caused by this crisis to build a better economy for all: revitalize the international trading system, foster an international system of taxation where everyone pays their fair share, and accelerate the transition to the new climate economy on which the health and prosperity of our children depends.

“Finally, we must not forget the world beyond the G20: the poorest countries that are least equipped to withstand shocks. The IMF will continue to count on the G20’s support to have all the necessary resources to best serve our member countries, and especially those who need our assistance the most.

“Since this is our last meeting of 2020, I would like to congratulate the Saudi authorities on a successful G20 presidency during a very challenging year—a year like no other. I look forward to next year’s G20 under Italy’s Presidency.”

Joint Statement on Data Protection and Privacy in the COVID-19 Response

Data Protection/Privacy

Joint Statement on Data Protection and Privacy in the COVID-19 Response
19 November 2020
The United Nations, IOM, ITU, OCHA, OHCHR, UNDP, UNEP, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNICEF, UNOPS, UPU, UN Volunteers, UN Women, WFP and WHO support the adoption of the following joint statement, in line with the UN Personal Data Protection and Privacy Principles adopted by the UN System Organizations to support its use of data and technology in the COVID-19 response in a way that respects the right to privacy and other human rights and promotes economic and social development.

The COVID-19 pandemic has become a global emergency, with devastating consequences in terms of loss of life and economic decline, and significantly hampering progress toward achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Poor and vulnerable communities are particularly imperiled by this deadly disease and its economic ramifications.

Mounting evidence demonstrates that the collection, use, sharing and further processing of data can help limit the spread of the virus and aid in accelerating the recovery, especially through digital contact tracing. Mobility data derived from people’s usage of mobile phones, emails, banking, social media, postal services, for instance, can assist in monitoring the spread of the virus and support the implementation of the UN System Organizations’ mandated activities.[1]

Such data collection and processing, including for digital contact tracing and general health surveillance, may include the collection of vast amounts of personal and non-personal sensitive data. This could have significant effects beyond the initial crisis response phase, including, if such measures are applied for purposes not directly or specifically related to the COVID-19 response, potentially leading to the infringement of fundamental human rights and freedoms. This concern is especially pressing if some emergency measures introduced to address the pandemic, such as digital contact tracing, are turned into standard practice.

The UN Secretary-General highlighted in his policy brief on human rights and COVID-19 that “Human rights are key in shaping the pandemic response, both for the public health emergency and the broader impact on people’s lives and livelihoods. Human rights put people centre-stage. Responses that are shaped by and respect human rights result in better outcomes in beating the pandemic, ensuring healthcare for everyone and preserving human dignity.”

Any data collection, use and processing by UN System Organizations in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic should be rooted in human rights and implemented with due regard to applicable international law, data protection and privacy principles, including the UN Personal Data Protection and Privacy Principles. Any measures taken to address the COVID-19 pandemic should also be consistent with the mandates of the respective UN System Organizations and take into account the balancing of relevant rights, including the right to health and life and the right to economic and social development.

Taking into account the UN Personal Data Protection and Privacy Principles, the UN Secretary-General’s policy brief on human rights and COVID-19, and relevant health and humanitarian standards, data collection, use and processing by UN System Organizations in their operations should, at a minimum:
:: Be lawful, limited in scope and time, and necessary and proportionate to specified and legitimate purposes in response to the COVID-19 pandemic;
:: Ensure appropriate confidentiality, security, time-bound retention and proper destruction or deletion of data in accordance with the aforementioned purposes;
:: Ensure that any data exchange adheres to applicable international law, data protection and privacy principles, and is evaluated based on proper due diligence and risks assessments;
:: Be subject to any applicable mechanisms and procedures to ensure that measures taken with regard to data use are justified by and in accordance with the aforementioned principles and purposes, and cease as soon as the need for such measures is no longer present; and
:: Be transparent in order to build trust in the deployment of current and future efforts alike.

A coordinated and inclusive global UN-wide response rooted in solidarity is necessary to contain the pandemic and minimize its negative impact across the world. Although the statement is aimed to address the challenges of the current COVID-19 pandemic, it may serve as a precedent for using data to respond to any future crises of a similar scale quickly and while respecting data protection and privacy.

World Bank Expands Support for Basic Service Delivery to Rohingya and Local Communities in Cox’s Bazar

Rohingya/Cox’s Bazaar – Basic Services

World Bank Expands Support for Basic Service Delivery to Rohingya and Local Communities in Cox’s Bazar
DHAKA, November 18, 2020 – The government of Bangladesh today signed a $100 million grant financing agreement with the World Bank to scale up access to energy, water, sanitation services and disaster-resilient infrastructures for the Rohingya and the surrounding host communities.

The additional financing to the ongoing Emergency Multi-Sector Rohingya Crisis Response Project will benefit about 780,800 people, including 140,800 local people with better public infrastructure. This will help about 365,800 people access to improved water sources and 171,800 people access better sanitation. This will be achieved through installing mini-piped water supply schemes, point water sources, and rainwater harvesting systems, along with household toilets and community toilets in the Cox’s Bazar district.

“Since the very beginning of the crisis, the World Bank has been supporting Bangladesh respond to the needs of Rohingya people as well as the host communities,” said Mercy Miyang Tembon, World Bank Country Director for Bangladesh and Bhutan. “We recognize that the sheer magnitude of the influx placed enormous pressure on Cox’s Bazar’s infrastructure and provision of basic services. The additional financing will help alleviate the pressure and address the needs of the host communities as well as the Rohingya people.”

It will help build 40 multi-purpose disaster shelters, accessible to 81,000 people and climate resilient evacuation roads, as well as install around 4,000 solar streetlights and 975 lightning protection systems. It will also help government agencies to strengthen institutional systems and capacities to plan, coordinate and respond to crisis and emergencies…

The Innovative Humanitarian Financing Forum to develop collaboration with WEF

Humanitarian Response – Financing

The Innovative Humanitarian Financing Forum to develop collaboration with WEF
19 Nov 2020
The Innovative Humanitarian Financing Forum (IHFF), founded by leaders from IFFIm’s Board and the British Red Cross, convened online on 4 November 2020, bringing to the table 33 people from 17 organisations, both returning and new participants, to explore ways to catalyse humanitarian investing initiatives.

Launched to enthusiastic response in London in March 2020, just days before the COVID-19 pandemic forced borders and institutions to close, the IHFF is a group of stakeholders from humanitarian organisations as well as the private sector who are dedicated to finding ways to fund the gap between private finance, public and philanthropic funding to confront growing crises in health and safety in low-income countries…

Representatives from Red Cross, IFFIm and London Business School led discussions touching on several themes, from defining the purpose of IHFF in 2021 and exploring collaborations with likeminded organisations…

Finance executive and former World Bank Treasurer Kenneth Lay, newly appointed to the IFFIm board and its next Board Chair, talked about a topic central to IHFF’s purpose: scale and affordability in funding global public goods…

Mr Lay pointed to the estimated $200 Trillion global savings pool that has increased during the 2020 pandemic and a growing percent allocated in ethical investing. Knowing this interest and money exists, the humanitarian financing community must step up investment in crucial development work and humanitarian response through new tools. Mr Lay cited relevant examples of innovative product types including direct market financing, front loading, outcome-based financing, risk-sharing mechanisms, debt restructuring and voluntary concessionary financing..

Mr Lay endorsed IHFF as a cross-sector forum that aims to engage humanitarian actors with stakeholders from public and private sector These include developers of projects and programs supporting global public goods; sovereigns and others in the official sector; bankers and investment managers; NGOs and philanthropies; and others. Mr Lay encouraged forum participants to think outside their sector and network to move forward. “This effort will require creative thinking and new approaches,” concluded Mr Lay. “That may not be easy going. It’s a new way to think and work,” he said.

… introduced the HRI Initiative, which brings together key humanitarian and development actors and representatives from the investor and corporate communities. Co-Chaired by WEF, World Bank Group, ICRC, Credit Suisse, and the Netherlands, the HRI aims to accelerate and shape the market for humanitarian and resilience investing by unlocking part of the $200 trillion of invested private capital…

About IHFF
The Innovative Humanitarian Financing Forum (IHFF) was founded in March 2020 to bring together representatives of public and private institutions in business, banking, charities and humanitarian organisations to explore how novel financial tools and instruments could expand resources for urgent humanitarian needs, from health emergencies and education to sanitation, hygiene and climate change.

The Drivers of Institutional Trust and Distrust – Rand

Governance – Trust in Institutions

The Drivers of Institutional Trust and Distrust
Exploring Components of Trustworthiess
by Jennifer Kavanagh, Katherine Grace Carman, Maria DeYoreo, Nathan Chandler, Lynn E. Davis
Rand Corporate
2020 :: 240 pages
ISBN/EAN: 9781977406118 DOI: https://doi.org/10.7249/RRA112-7 Doc Number: RR-A112-7
Overview
Trust in many institutions, such as government and media, has declined in the past two decades. Although such trends are well documented, they are not well understood. The study described in this report presents a new framework for assessing institutional trust and understanding the individual characteristics and institutional attributes that affect trust. Analysis is based on a survey of 1,008 respondents conducted through the RAND Corporation’s American Life Panel in April 2018. The study makes several key contributions to the field of institutional trust research. First, researchers used a scale that distinguishes between trust and distrust, thus allowing a different understanding of trust. Second, the analysis is a first step toward understanding why people trust institutions. The framework allows exploration of components of trustworthiness—i.e., the institutional attributes that people say they consider important to levels of trust (e.g., integrity, competence). The researchers also analyzed relationships between components of trustworthiness and the individual characteristics of those expressing the level of trust. Third, the survey featured questions about multiple institutions, allowing researchers to make comparisons across institutions. The research provides insights into individual characteristics and institutional attributes associated with institutional trust. This study is a “first cut” at a complicated concept and at exploring what is needed to rebuild institutional trust.

Research Questions
[1] How has trust been researched before?
[2] How do different institutions rank in terms of trustworthiness?
[3] By what criteria do people assess the trustworthiness of institutions?
[4] How do personal characteristics affect whether one trusts a given institution?

Key Findings
Most previous studies focus on trust but disregard active distrust
:: The authors of this report developed a ten-point scale that ranges from high trust (10) through lack of trust or distrust (5) to active distrust (0).

Distrust in media and government institutions is widespread
:: Social media and Congress registered the lowest levels of trust among respondents.
:: Only two institutions—local newspapers and the military—registered a level of trust that was above the midpoint of the scale.
:: Levels of trust, most notably for media institutions, varied depending on respondents’ individual characteristics.

Respondents prioritized components of trustworthiness differently for different institutions
:: Five dimensions—competence, integrity, performance, accuracy, and relevance of information provided—were the most-reported drivers of trust in institutions among respondents.
:: Perceived competence and integrity of representatives mattered most in assessments of trust in Congress; accuracy and relevance of information provided were most consistently associated with trust in media. Competence, performance, and accuracy of information provided were most relevant to reported trust in the military.

Researchers examined how various respondent characteristics tied to perceptions of trustworthiness
:: When such characteristics as gender, age, education, partisanship, and employment were factored into analysis, the result indicate that different groups of people named different components as driving their perceptions of trustworthiness of different institutions.
:: Individuals who reported active distrust in the institutions examined had different demographic and other characteristics (and named different components of trustworthiness as relevant to their attitudes) from other respondents who reported no trust or distrust or higher levels of trust.

Recommendation
The results presented are intended as a first attempt at understanding how components of trust are related to trust in key institutions. There are several limitations to this research that should be considered and addressed in future research.

6th Meeting of the Technical & Advisory Committee of the Great Museum of Africa

Heritage Stewardship

6th Meeting of the Technical & Advisory Committee of the Great Museum of Africa
November 19, 2020
The Technical and Advisory Committee of the Great Museum of Africa (GMA) held their 6th Meeting Virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In July 2016, the Executive Council of the African Union approved the establishment of the Great Museum of Africa to be located in Algiers as a Flagship Project of Agenda 2063 in its 1st Ten Year Implementation Plan (EX./CL/921 (XXIX))…

The Meeting was presented with the data collected from the public consultation on the Great Museum of Africa which highlighted the following: Knowledge of the concept of the GMA and its main feature including its vision and mission; its governance structure; communication and marketing strategy. The Meeting called for a wide dissemination of the survey link including social media networks to allow for popularization and dissemination of the Great Museum of Africa concept. The public consultation will be opened until the end of December 2020.

…The African Charter for African Cultural Renaissance recognises the important role that culture pays in mobilising and unifying people around common ideals and promoting African culture to build the ideals of Pan-Africanism. The Great African Museum project aims to create awareness about Africa’s vast, dynamic and diverse cultural artefacts and the influence Africa has had and continues to have on the various cultures of the world in areas such as art, music, language, science, and so on. The Great African Museum will be a focal centre for preserving and promoting the African cultural heritage.

The Great African Museum will be responsible for the collection, preservation, study, interpretation, and exhibition of Africa’s diverse cultures, heritage, history, and outstanding natural beauty, for integration, intercultural engagements, and economic prosperity. Through its collections, activities and advocacy, the Great African Museum will inspire generations to harness the continent’s history and endowments for advancement and promote cultural and creative industries, integration, solidarity, respect of values and mutual understanding in order to foster peace and promote a positive image of Africa.

Coronavirus [COVID-19] – Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

EMERGENCIES

Coronavirus [COVID-19]
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Weekly Epidemiological and Operational updates
last update: 14 November 2020, 10:30 GMT-4
Confirmed cases :: 57 274 018 [week ago: 53 164 803] [two weeks ago: 49 106 931]
Confirmed deaths :: 1 368 000 [week ago: 1 300 576] [two weeks ago: 1 239 157]
Countries, areas or territories with cases :: 220

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WHO Director-General’s opening remarks at the media briefing on COVID-19 – 20 November 2020
20 November 2020

Weekly epidemiological update – 17 November 2020
Overview
Globally in the past week, rates of new COVID-19 cases and deaths continued to increase, with almost 4 million new cases and 60 000 new deaths recorded. Cumulatively as of 15 November 2020, 53.7 million confirmed cases and 1.3 million deaths have been reported to WHO.

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POLIO Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC); WHO/OCHA Emergencies

Emergencies

POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Polio this week as of 18 November 2020
:: On 13 November, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Prequalification (PQ) program issued an Emergency Use Listing (EUL) recommendation for the type 2 novel oral polio vaccine (nOPV2). This will allow rollout of the vaccine for limited initial use in countries affected by circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) outbreaks…Read more

Summary of new WPV and cVDPV viruses this week (AFP cases and environmental samples):
:: Afghanistan: one WPV1 case, one WPV1 positive environmental sample and one cVDPV2 positive environmental sample
:: Pakistan: one WPV1 case, three WPV1 positive environmental samples, three cVDPV2 cases and two cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Burkina Faso: five cVDPV2 cases
:: Democratic Republic of the Congo: three cVDPV2 cases
:: Ghana: one cVDPV2 positive environmental sample
:: Nigeria: one cVDPV2 case
:: Sudan: five cVDPV2 cases and three positive environmental samples

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WHO Grade 3 Emergencies [to 21 Nov 2020]

Democratic Republic of the Congo – No new digest announcements identified
Mozambique floods – No new digest announcements identified
Nigeria – No new digest announcements identified
Somalia – No new digest announcements identified
South Sudan – No new digest announcements identified
Syrian Arab Republic – No new digest announcements identified
Yemen – No new digest announcements identified

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WHO Grade 2 Emergencies [to 21 Nov 2020]
Iraq
:: Prioritizing a transition from psychiatric hospital-based to community-based mental health services in Iraq 16 November 2020

Afghanistan – No new digest announcements identified
Angola – No new digest announcements identified
Burkina Faso – No new digest announcements identified
Burundi – No new digest announcements identified
Cameroon – No new digest announcements identified
Central African Republic – No new digest announcements identified
Ethiopia – No new digest announcements identified
Iran floods 2019 – No new digest announcements identified
Libya – No new digest announcements identified
Malawi Floods – No new digest announcements identified
Measles in Europe – No new digest announcements identified
MERS-CoV – No new digest announcements identified
Mozambique – No new digest announcements identified
Myanmar – No new digest announcements identified
Niger – No new digest announcements identified
occupied Palestinian territory – No new digest announcements identified
HIV in Pakistan – No new digest announcements identified
Sao Tome and Principe Necrotizing Cellulitis (2017) – No new digest announcements identified
Sudan – No new digest announcements identified
Ukraine – No new digest announcements identified
Zimbabwe – No new digest announcements identified

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WHO Grade 1 Emergencies [to 21 Nov 2020]

Chad – No new digest announcements identified
Djibouti – Page not responding at inquiry
Kenya – No new digest announcements identified
Mali – No new digest announcements identified
Namibia – viral hepatitis – No new digest announcements identified
Tanzania – No new digest announcements identified

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UN OCHA – L3 Emergencies
The UN and its humanitarian partners are currently responding to three ‘L3’ emergencies. This is the global humanitarian system’s classification for the response to the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises. 
Syrian Arab Republic
:: Recent Developments in Northwest Syria – Situation Report No. 22 – As of 18 November 2020
Some 80 percent of all confirmed COVID-19 cases in northwest Syria were identified in the past month. Seven new treatment centres have been added, for a total of 26 with a capacity of 1,110 beds, and precautionary measures are being reintroduced especially in the Idleb area.
…Ongoing hostilities encroach on population areas, leading to higher civilian casualties…

Yemen – No new digest announcements identified

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UN OCHA – Corporate Emergencies
When the USG/ERC declares a Corporate Emergency Response, all OCHA offices, branches and sections provide their full support to response activities both at HQ and in the field.
East Africa Locust Infestation
:: Desert Locust situation update – 20 November 2020

COVID-19
:: Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19): Weekly Epidemiological Update (17 November 2020)

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 14 November 2020 :: Number 341

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDFThe Sentinel_ period ending 14 Nov 2020

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles

We Face Greatest Test of Global Solidarity in Generations, as COVID-19 Inflicts Unprecedented Harm,

Global Governance

We Face Greatest Test of Global Solidarity in Generations, as COVID-19 Inflicts Unprecedented Harm, Secretary-General Tells Group of 77 Ministers
12 November 2020
SG/SM/20413
…We are at a historic moment as we face the greatest test of global solidarity in generations. The COVID-19 pandemic continues to inflict unprecedented harm on people, societies and economies around the world. The pandemic has pushed us towards one of the worst recessions in modern times, which is having a devastating effect on the most vulnerable countries and peoples.

The progress we have made together over recent decades on your top priorities — eradicating poverty and hunger, increasing opportunities for all, and reducing inequalities within and between countries — that progress is being eroded in a matter of months.

At the beginning of this year, we launched the Decade of Action to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals. Our aim was to accelerate implementation in those areas where we are off track and to address major financial gaps.

But today, we face even more serious headwinds. But within this crisis lies an opportunity — a chance to embark on a path to revive economies, ensure gender equality, protect our planet and achieve the SDGs [Sustainable Development Goals] by 2030.

A path that ensures universal access to social protection, health care, quality education and digital connectivity. A path towards a rapid and just transition to low-carbon, climate-resilient economies that generate investment, growth and employment. A path that nurtures social cohesion, advances human rights and builds peace.

The United Nations is calling for a transformative response and recovery, based on unity and solidarity. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, the Paris Agreement [on climate change] and the Sendai Framework [for Disaster Risk Reduction] remain our guiding lights. They must be at the heart of all national and global response and recovery efforts…

The Elders express deep concern at failure to respect US democratic transition of power

Sovereign Governance

The Elders express deep concern at failure to respect US democratic transition of power
Statement
12 Nov 2020
The Elders today expressed deep concern about US President Donald Trump’s refusal to adhere to the protocols and processes governing the transition of power, as putting at risk the functioning of American democracy.

The continued assertions of electoral fraud by the President and some senior members of the Administration and of the Republican Party, offered as yet without any compelling evidence, convey a lack of respect for the integrity and independence of the democratic and legal institutions of the United States, The Elders warned.

Such an unprecedented situation could have far-reaching consequences beyond the United States’ borders. Those who stand to benefit from the current impasse are autocratic rulers and malign actors who wish to undermine democracy and the rule of law across the world.

The Elders noted that all living former US Presidents, including the last Republican incumbent George W. Bush, have congratulated President-elect Joe Biden and deemed the election outcome to be clear and fair.

Notwithstanding any continuing legal challenges, President Trump should follow the example set by his predecessors and declare himself willing to accept the verdict cast by the American people at the ballot box. The executive powers available to the President until his successor assumes office on 20 January 2021 should be used judiciously in the interests of the whole United States, rather than for partisan gain.

The Elders called on Republican leaders to act responsibly and in the interests of their country by supporting a smooth transition and pursuing their political agenda with integrity.

Continued baseless accusations of subversion risk further deepening the instability and polarisation in American society, and eroding public faith in institutions that is the bedrock of democratic life.

Mary Robinson, Chair of The Elders and former President of Ireland, said: “It is shocking to have to raise concerns about US democratic processes as The Elders have previously commented on volatile and undemocratic situations in states such as Kenya, Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe. President Trump’s refusal thus far to facilitate a smooth transition weakens democratic values. His fellow Republicans must now affirm their faith in the US Constitution, democratic institutions and the rule of law, so the country can begin a process of reconciliation.”

Historic statement by Public Development Banks signals greater commitment to tackle global hunger and poverty

Development Finance

Historic statement by Public Development Banks signals greater commitment to tackle global hunger and poverty
Rome, 11 November 2020 – For the first time in history, today 13 Public Development Banks (PDBs) made a joint commitment to strengthen investments in food and agriculture in the context of a global pandemic and a changing climate, with more signatories expected in the coming days.

This unprecedented move comes as an urgent response to the world’s most pressing development and climate challenges in some of the most vulnerable countries.

“COVID-19 and climate change are putting enormous stress on our food systems,” said Gilbert F. Houngbo, President of the UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) which convened the PDB discussions and the subsequent joint statement that was released today.

“We need to act now and step up financing if we want to free the world from hunger and poverty by 2030, and offer a sustainable future to the two billion rural people who grow much of our world’s food. Public Development Banks can be leaders in in unlocking opportunities, building a more resilient world and ensuring more equitable societies.”

The statement contributes to the Finance in Common Summit (9-12 November) where 450 PDBs from all sectors will meet for the first time to commit to actions that shift investments to a greener and more sustainable path, while responding to the COVID-19 crisis.

The statement has been signed so far by 13 agriculture and rural banks from Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America, and regional rural and agricultural credit associations. While these banks may be diverse in terms of capital base, mandate and instruments, the statement emphasizes the critical role they all play in financing future sustainable and inclusive food systems, and in addressing market failures – particularly in times of crisis such as the current COVID-19 pandemic.

To that end, the statement stresses the need to improve regulations, policies, governance and institutional capacity to allow PDBs to take on the necessary investment risks while remaining financially viable and institutionally sustainable in a rapidly changing financial market.

The signatories also acknowledge the importance of focusing on smallholder farmers and small and medium-sized agribusinesses, and developing financial products and services tailored to their needs. Their ability to access finance for investment is often constrained by their size, asset base, fragmentation and lack of information and coordination in both agricultural and financial markets.

“It is critical that Public Development Banks focus on small-scale producers and agripreneurs who are the backbone of food systems and economies of many low and middle income countries,” said Houngbo. “With access to finance, they can be far more productive and contribute to broader food security and prosperity.”

The statement further emphasizes the important role of PDBs as catalyzers of private sector investments which are often hindered by a variety of risks, costs, and poor economic returns. PDBs can develop innovative financial solutions to attract investors to the sector and help align commercial finance to global development, environmental and climate-related goals.

Principled Aid Index 2020 – Harnessing values and interests in donor pandemic response

“Principled” Aid

Principled Aid Index 2020 – Harnessing values and interests in donor pandemic response
ODI Working and discussion papers 596 | November 2020 | Nilima Gulrajani and Emily Silcock
The Principled Aid Index ranks bilateral DAC donors by how they use official development assistance to pursue their long-term national interest.

Key Messages
:: Donors provide foreign aid to advance their values and protect their interests. The Principled Aid Index measures the strength of these dual motives as revealed by donor spending choices and trends.

:: Higher ranked donors focus on plugging development gaps, investing in global institutions and challenges, and committing to public spirited behaviours that do not instrumentalise aid for narrow, short-term gain. By pursuing the values of solidarity and collective action, donors gain future benefits indirectly for their citizens by fostering greater global stability, security and prosperity.

:: This year the Index identifies a decline in principled aid scores that started before the Covid-19 pandemic. The data shows worsening scores even among donors at the top of the rankings, driven by diminished public spiritedness as aid is allocated in ways that may secure direct shor tterm commercial and geo-strategic advantages.

:: The fragmented response by bilateral donors to the coronavirus crisis over the last eight months is in keeping with this downward trajectory of principled aid.

:: Now is the time for donors to broaden their response effort and attend in parallel to the wider socio-economic consequences of the crisis in affected countries. This involves acknowledging coronavirus as a protracted, multi-faceted global shock where interventions need to extend beyond the immediate health emergency and straddle the humanitarian–development nexus.

:: Focusing on building broad-based resilience can reduce donors’ exposure and vulnerability to future pandemics, as well as other emerging global challenges. A framework of ‘principled nationalism’ can guide donor efforts to address systemic global inequalities laid bare by the coronavirus crisis, and frame international actions to recover and rebuild.

Translating Policy Intent into Action: A Framework to Facilitate Implementation of Agricultural Policies in Africa

Policy to Practice

Translating Policy Intent into Action: A Framework to Facilitate Implementation of Agricultural Policies in Africa
Research Report November 11, 2020
Urban Institute :: Matthew Eldridge, Justin Milner, James Ladi Williams
Abstract
Agriculture is crucial for Africa’s development and there is wide consensus that inclusive agricultural transformations are needed across the continent. However, progress has not kept pace with ambition. Even when governments design and approve policies based on the best available evidence, they often struggle to implement them. To help policymakers, donors, and other stakeholders identify, understand, and address these barriers to implementing agricultural policies, the Urban Institute developed a Policy Implementation Assessment Framework. This framework identifies five domains and, within them, 15 factors, that are critical to determining and improving a given policy’s “implement ability.”

Top 10 Emerging Technologies to Watch in 2020 :: World Economic Forum

Technology

Top 10 Emerging Technologies to Watch in 2020
World Economic Forum
10 Nov 2020
:: Electric planes, pain-free needles and virtual patients, are among the top 10 emerging technologies to watch in 2020
:: The list is compiled by a group of experts convened by the World Economic Forum and Scientific American.
:: To be selected, technologies must be new and poised to impact the world in the next three to five years.
: View the full list here.

New York, 10 November 2020 – From virtual patients to pain-free needles, synthesizing whole-genomes, and digital medicine, these top 10 emerging technologies are transforming our post-COVID-19 lives. An international steering group of experts singled out these and other emerging technologies as the ones most likely to impact the world in the next three to five years.

For example, a Swiss group was able to synthesize the entire COVID-19 genome by reproducing the genetic sequence uploaded by Chinese scientists. They were essentially teleporting the virus into their laboratory for study without waiting for physical samples. The ability to write our genome will inevitably help doctors to cure genetic diseases.

As we now move to clinical trials of a COVID-19 vaccine, virtual patients, instead of living humans, could help identify successful vaccine candidates, reduce costs, and speed up research. It would also prevent the testing of imperfect vaccine candidates on living volunteers.

While the outbreak unfolded, dozens of medical apps and bots were developed, expanding the digital medicine landscape. These apps could detect depression and provided counselling. Bots answered over 200 million inquiries about COVID symptoms and treatments. COVID-19 will continue to shape our lives, and these emerging technologies could fill the gaps created by the pandemic.

The list also includes new technologies that can help combat climate change by tackling major polluting industries. These new green technologies include innovative planes, new concrete formulations and using sunlight to power refineries.

Top 10 technologies to make the list are:
Virtual Patients
Virtual patients, instead of living humans, could make vaccine trials quicker and inexpensive. This technology would significantly reduce the number of human subjects needed for experimentation.

Microneedles for Painless Injections and Tests
These tiny needles promise pain-free injections and blood testing. Microneedles do not touch nerve endings. Since the process does not need costly equipment or a lot of training, they can be used in areas that do not normally receive cutting-edge medical technologies.

Whole-Genome Synthesis
Whole-genome synthesizing will transform cell engineering. The ability to write our genome will inevitably help doctors to cure genetic diseases.

Digital Medicine
Digital medicine is a collection of apps that detect and monitor the mental and physical health of patients. These apps and bots can enhance traditional medicine and provide support to patients with limited access to healthcare.

Electric Aviation
Electric propulsion motors would eliminate direct carbon emissions. This technology could also reduce fuel costs by up to 90%, maintenance by up to 50% and noise by nearly 70%. Currently, about 170 electric airplane projects are underway.

Lower-Carbon Cement
Concrete, the most widely used human-made material, shapes much of our built world. If cement production were a country, it would be the third-largest emitter after China and the US. Researchers are working on lower-carbon approaches by changing the recipe, using different materials, and using carbon capture and storage technologies.

Sun-Powered Chemistry
This approach uses sunlight to convert carbon dioxide waste into needed chemicals manufactured from fossil fuel. This approach could reduce emissions in two ways – by using unwanted gas as raw material and using sunlight as the source of energy instead of fossil fuels.

Green Hydrogen
Current methods of producing hydrogen are not environmentally efficient. Green hydrogen, produced through electrolysis, has no by-product, unlike current processes. Green hydrogen could transform industries that require high-energy fuel.

Spatial Computing
“Spatial computing” will bring together raise reality apps and sensors to facilitate human-machine and machine-machine interactions to a new level. It combines these capabilities and controls objects’ movements and interactions, allowing a person to navigate the digital and physical world.

Quantum Sensing
Quantum sensors enable autonomous vehicles that can “see” around corners, underwater navigation systems, early-warning systems for volcanic activity and earthquakes, and portable scanners that monitor a person’s brain activity during daily life.

The World Economic Forum’s inaugural Pioneers of Change Summit will take place online on 16-20 November. The summit brings together more than 750 leaders from government, business and civil society from more than 90 countries. The summit takes place at a time when there is a rare, but narrow, window of opportunity to reflect, reimagine and reset the world. Key topics discussed include: digital business, sustainable production, infrastructure, health, new work models, financial innovation and frontier technologies…

Over US$ 2 billion raised to support equitable access to COVID vaccines with additional US$ 5 billion needed in 2021

Milestones :: Perspectives :: Research

Over US$ 2 billion raised to support equitable access to COVID vaccines with additional US$ 5 billion needed in 2021 – Gavi
13 November 2020
:: The European Commission, France, Spain, The Republic of Korea and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation pledge US$ 360 million to Gavi’s COVID-19 Vaccines Advance Market Commitment (COVAX AMC)
:: Latest announcements mean over US$ 2 billion has been raised towards the effort to ensure equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines for low- and middle-income economies, with at least US$ 5 billion more needed in 2021
:: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has also pledged an additional US$ 20 million to the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) to support COVID-19 vaccine research and development

Geneva, 13 November 2020 – Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance welcomes latest pledges in support of the Gavi COVAX AMC, a financing mechanism that will support 92 low- and middle-income economies’ access to safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines. The approximately US$360 million in commitments include US$350m announced at the Paris Peace Forum by the European Commission, France, Spain and The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, as well as an earlier pledge of US$10 million made by the Republic of Korea. This means that over US$ 2 billion has been raised for the Gavi COVAX AMC so far, thanks to contributions from other sovereign donors, the private sector, and philanthropic sources. This funding will allow COVAX AMC to reserve and access 1 billion doses for AMC-eligible economies, with at least US$ 5 billion needed in 2021 to procure doses as they come through the portfolio.

The announcements come as 94 higher-income economies have officially joined the COVAX Facility, a global effort to ensure rapid and equitable access to safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines for the most vulnerable groups across the world. These 94 self-financing participants in the COVAX Facility will join the 92 low- and middle-income economies eligible to have their participation in the Facility supported by the Gavi COVAX AMC.

“We are incredibly grateful for the support received so far. This vital funding not only helps us ensure lower-income economies aren’t left at the back of the queue when safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines become available, it will also play a vital role in ending the acute phase of this pandemic worldwide,” said Dr Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. “However, this is not the time to take our foot off the gas. We urgently need to raise at least an additional US$ 5 billion by the end of 2021 to ensure equitable distribution of these vaccines to those who need them.”

The details of the latest Gavi COVAX pledges received are as follows:
:: The President of the European Commission pledged EUR 100 million (approximately US$ 120 million) with the aim to support access to vaccines in lower income countries. This amount is in addition to the EUR 400 million (approximately US$ 480 million) in guarantees approved by the European Investment Bank (EIB) on Wednesday. These commitments contribute to Team Europe, a joint effort between the Commission, EIB, the EU’s 27 Member States, Norway and Iceland.

:: France confirmed that the EUR 100m (approximately US$ 120 million) pledged at the Global Vaccine Summit on June 4, as special funds for Gavi to combat COVID-19, will go towards the Gavi COVAX AMC.

:: Spain confirmed that EUR 50 million (approximately US$ 60 million) pledged at the Global Vaccine Summit on June 4, as special funds for Gavi to combat COVID-19, will go towards the Gavi COVAX AMC.

:: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation pledged US$ 50 million to the Gavi COVAX AMC. This amount is in addition to US$ 106 million pledged by the Foundation for the COVAX AMC, bringing their total contribution to US$ 156 million.

:: The Republic of Korea has earlier pledged US$ 10 million of new funding to the Gavi COVAX AMC.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation also pledged an additional US$ 20 million to CEPI, which is leading COVAX vaccine research and development work to develop safe and effective vaccines which can be made available to countries participating in the COVAX Facility. Nine candidate vaccines are currently being supported by CEPI; eight of which are currently in clinical trials. Governments, vaccine manufacturers (in addition to their own R&D), organisations and individuals have committed US$ 1.3 billion towards vaccine R&D so far, but an additional US$800m is urgently needed to continue to move the portfolio forward.

The COVAX Facility is part of COVAX, the vaccines pillar of the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator, which is co-led by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and the World Health Organization (WHO) – working in partnership with developed and developing country vaccine manufacturers, UNICEF, the World Bank, civil society organisations and others. COVAX is the only global initiative that is working with governments and manufacturers to ensure COVID-19 vaccines are available worldwide to economies of all financial means.

Coronavirus [COVID-19] Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

EMERGENCIES

Coronavirus [COVID-19]
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Weekly Epidemiological and Operational updates
last update: 14 November 2020, 10:30 GMT-4
Confirmed cases :: 53 164 803 [week ago: 49 106 931] [two weeks ago: 45 428 73]
Confirmed deaths :: 1 300 576 [week ago: 1 239 157] [two weeks ago: 1 185 721]
Countries, areas or territories with cases :: 220

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10 November 2020
Weekly epidemiological update – 10 November 2020
Overview
Globally in the past week, cases of COVID-19 have increased by 8%, compared to the previous week, resulting in over 3.6 million new cases, while new deaths have increased by 21% to over 54 000. This brings the cumulative numbers to over 49.7 million reported cases and over 1.2 million deaths globally since the start of the pandemic.

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POLIO Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC); WHO/OCHA Emergencies

Emergencies

POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Polio this week as of 11 November 2020
:: In a year marked by the global COVID-19 pandemic, global health leaders convening virtually at this week’s World Health Assembly called for continued urgent action on polio eradication. The Assembly congratulated the African region on reaching the public health milestone of certification as wild polio free, but highlighted the importance of global solidarity to achieve the goal of global eradication and certification…Read more
:: Last week, WHO and UNICEF launched an emergency call to action for measles and polio outbreak response, to protect children by vaccination. It is a global call to action, both for countries to re-boost their immunization systems in the wake of COVID-19 and for the international community to work together to ensure that the financial resources needed on an emergency basis are rapidly made available.
:: 13 November is the deadline for prospective bidders to submit their applications for the Consultancy to provide technical support to the GACVS (Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety) Sub-Committee for nOPV2. More information on the Request for Proposals.

Summary of new WPV and cVDPV viruses this week (AFP cases and environmental samples):
:: Afghanistan: 15 cVDPV2 cases and 13 cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Pakistan: five WPV1 positive environmental samples and five cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Chad: one cVDPV2 case
:: Somalia: three cVDPV2 cases

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WHO Grade 3 Emergencies [to 14 Nov 2020]

Democratic Republic of the Congo – No new digest announcements identified
Mozambique floods – No new digest announcements identified
Nigeria – No new digest announcements identified
Somalia – No new digest announcements identified
South Sudan – No new digest announcements identified
Syrian Arab Republic – No new digest announcements identified
Yemen – No new digest announcements identified

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WHO Grade 2 Emergencies [to 14 Nov 2020]
Afghanistan – No new digest announcements identified
Angola – No new digest announcements identified
Burkina Faso – No new digest announcements identified
Burundi – No new digest announcements identified
Cameroon – No new digest announcements identified
Central African Republic – No new digest announcements identified
Ethiopia – No new digest announcements identified
Iran floods 2019 – No new digest announcements identified
Iraq – No new digest announcements identified
Libya – No new digest announcements identified
Malawi Floods – No new digest announcements identified
Measles in Europe – No new digest announcements identified
MERS-CoV – No new digest announcements identified
Mozambique – No new digest announcements identified
Myanmar – No new digest announcements identified
Niger – No new digest announcements identified
occupied Palestinian territory – No new digest announcements identified
HIV in Pakistan – No new digest announcements identified
Sao Tome and Principe Necrotizing Cellulitis (2017) – No new digest announcements identified
Sudan – No new digest announcements identified
Ukraine – No new digest announcements identified
Zimbabwe – No new digest announcements identified

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WHO Grade 1 Emergencies [to 14 Nov 2020]

Chad – No new digest announcements identified
Djibouti – Page not responding at inquiry
Kenya – No new digest announcements identified
Mali – No new digest announcements identified
Namibia – viral hepatitis – No new digest announcements identified
Tanzania – No new digest announcements identified

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UN OCHA – L3 Emergencies
The UN and its humanitarian partners are currently responding to three ‘L3’ emergencies. This is the global humanitarian system’s classification for the response to the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises. 
Syrian Arab Republic
:: Syrian Arab Republic: COVID-19 Response Update No. 12 – 9 November 2020
HIGHLIGHTS
. As of 9 November, the Syrian Ministry of Health (MoH) reported 6,215 laboratory-confirmed cases, 317 fatalities, and 2,357 recoveries in Government of Syria (GoS)-controlled areas
. To date, 194 cases amongst healthcare workers (HCWs) in GoS-controlled areas have been reported
. In northwest Syria (NWS), as of 3 November, 7,059 confirmed cases of COVID-19 were reported, including 42 deaths
. In northeast Syria (NES), 4,978 cases were confirmed as of 3 November, including 758 recoveries and 133 deaths
.Areas of concern: Densely populated areas, notably Damascus/Rural Damascus, Aleppo and Homs, and those living in camps and informal settlements in NES, collective shelters throughout the country, as well as other areas, including Deir-Ez-Zor, where hostilities may make ongoing sample collection more challenging

Yemen – No new digest announcements identified

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UN OCHA – Corporate Emergencies
When the USG/ERC declares a Corporate Emergency Response, all OCHA offices, branches and sections provide their full support to response activities both at HQ and in the field.
East Africa Locust Infestation
:: Desert Locust situation update – 12 November 2020

COVID-19 – No new digest announcements identified

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 7 November 2020 :: Number 340

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDFThe Sentinel_ period ending 7 Nov 2020

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles