The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development

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Week ending 21 May 2022 :: Number 416

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development

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Week ending 14 May 2022 :: Number 415

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development

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Week ending 07 May 2022 :: Number 414

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development

__________________________________________________

Week ending 23 April 2022 :: Number 412

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development

__________________________________________________

Week ending 16 April 2022 :: Number 411

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development

__________________________________________________

Week ending 09 April 2022 :: Number 410

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development

__________________________________________________

Week ending 04 April 2022 :: Number 409

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development

__________________________________________________

Week ending 26 March 2022 :: Number 408

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development

__________________________________________________

Week ending 12 June 2021 :: Number 370

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

PDF:

CARBIS BAY G7 SUMMIT COMMUNIQUÉ

G7 – Cardiff, UK

Official Documents

Carbis Bay G7 Summit Communique (PDF, 430KB, 25 Pages)

Summary Of Carbis Bay G7 Summit Communique (PDF, 248KB, 2 Pages)

G7 Carbis Bay Health Declaration (PDF, 389KB, 4 Pages)

G7 2030 Nature Compact (PDF, 120KB, 4 pages)

G7 2021 Open Societies Statement (PDF, 355KB, 2 Pages)

G7 2021 Research Compact (PDF, 356KB, 2 Pages)

CARBIS BAY G7 SUMMIT COMMUNIQUÉ

Our Shared Agenda for Global Action to Build Back Better

[Initial text excerpt from 25 pages; Editor’s text bolding in dark red]]

We, the leaders of the Group of Seven, met in Cornwall on 11-13 June 2021 determined to beat COVID-19 and build back better. We remembered everyone who has been lost to the pandemic and paid tribute to those still striving to overcome it. Inspired by their example of collaboration and determination, we gathered united by the principle that brought us together originally, that shared beliefs and shared responsibilities are the bedrock of leadership and prosperity. Guided by this, our enduring ideals as free open societies and democracies, and by our commitment to multilateralism, we have agreed a shared G7 agenda for global action to:

:: End the pandemic and prepare for the future by driving an intensified international effort, starting immediately, to vaccinate the world by getting as many safe vaccines to as many people as possible as fast as possible. Total G7 commitments since the start of the pandemic provide for a total of over two billion vaccine doses, with the commitments since we last met in February 2021, including here in Carbis Bay, providing for one billion doses over the next year. At the same time we will create the appropriate frameworks  to strengthen our collective defences against threats to global health by: increasing and coordinating on global manufacturing capacity on all continents; improving early warning systems; and support science in a mission to shorten the cycle for the development of safe and effective vaccines, treatments and tests from 300 to 100 days.

:: Reinvigorate our economies by advancing recovery plans that build on the $12 trillion of support we have put in place during the pandemic. We will continue to support our economies for as long as is necessary, shifting the focus of our support from crisis response to promoting growth into the future, with plans that create jobs, invest in infrastructure, drive innovation, support people, and level up so that no place or person, irrespective of age, ethnicity or gender is left behind. This has not been the case with past global crises, and we are determined that this time it will be different.

:: Secure our future prosperity by championing freer, fairer trade within a reformed trading system, a more resilient global economy, and a fairer global tax system that reverses the race to the bottom. We will collaborate to ensure future frontiers of the global economy and society, from cyberspace to outer space, increase the prosperity and well-being of all people while upholding our values as open societies. We are convinced of the potential of technological transformation for the common good in accordance with our shared values.

:: Protect our planet by supporting a green revolution that creates jobs, cuts emission sand seeks to limit the rise in global temperatures to1.5 degrees. We commit to net zero no later than 2050, halving our collective emissions over the two decades to 2030, increasing and improving climate finance to 2025; and to conserve or protect at least 30 percent of our land and oceans by 2030. We acknowledge our duty to safeguard the planet for future generations.

:: Strengthen our partnerships with others around the world. We will develop a new partnership to build back better for the world, through a step change in our approach to investment for infrastructure, including through an initiative for clean and green growth. We are resolved to deepen our current partnership to a new deal with Africa, including by magnifying support from the International Monetary Fund for countries most in need to support our aim to reach a total global ambition of$100 billion.

:: Embrace our values as an enduring foundation for success in an everchanging world. We will harness the power of democracy, freedom, equality, the rule of law and respect for human rights to answer the biggest questions and overcome the greatest challenges. We will do this in a way that values the individual and promotes equality, especially gender equality, including by supporting a target to get 40 million more girls into education and with at least $2¾ billion for the Global Partnership for Education.

We shall seek to advance this open agenda in collaboration with other countries and within the multilateral rules-based system. In particular, we look forward to working alongside our G20 partners and with all relevant International Organizations to secure a cleaner, greener, freer, fairer and safer future for our people and planet…

FACT SHEET: United States and G7+ Plan to Defeat the COVID-19 Pandemic in 2022 and Prevent the Next Pandemic

FACT SHEET: United States and G7+ Plan to Defeat the COVID-19 Pandemic in 2022 and Prevent the Next Pandemic

June 11, 2021   Statements and Releases   [Excerpt; Text-bolding from original]

Today, President Biden welcomed the historic commitment of the leaders of the G7 and guest countries to provide more than 1 billion additional COVID-19 vaccines for the world, starting this summer, of which the United States will contribute half a billion doses.

This commitment forms the basis of a comprehensive set of G7+ actions towards ending this global pandemic in 2022. The G7+ action plan that will be agreed to by leaders in Cornwall includes vaccinating the world’s most vulnerable, providing emergency supplies, bolstering world-wide economic recovery, and positioning the international community to prepare for, prevent, detect, and respond to future biological catastrophes. 

The United States will lead the G7+ in a global COVID-19 vaccination campaign, providing 500 million safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines for the world through COVAX, with delivery starting in August 2021. This donation, which President Biden announced yesterday, is the largest single donation of vaccines in history and comprises half of the G7+ commitment to provide an additional 1 billion safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine doses over the next 12 months, especially to the world’s most vulnerable.

In addition, we are taking concrete and tangible steps to meet the ambition of the G7+ and drive action to end this pandemic and prevent the next. We call on other countries and private sector partners to join us. 

To end the global COVID-19 pandemic, the United States and the G7+ will:

:: Accelerate Vaccination of the World’s Most Vulnerable
We are fully committed to working towards the ambitious goal of ending the pandemic. Yesterday’s announcement of half a billion new vaccine doses comes on top of both the at least 80 million vaccine doses previously announced by President Biden and the $2 billion in funding which the United States has previously provided to Gavi to support COVAX. We call on countries to donate additional doses of safe and effective vaccines, strengthen vaccine readiness, and work with private sector partners to vaccinate the world. 
 

:: Support Last Mile Vaccination and Getting Shots into Arms
The Biden-Harris Administration will be providing hundreds of millions in support for programs that provide assistance to help countries and health systems prepare for vaccination around the world, including in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. That assistance comes on top of longstanding U.S. support for countries and communities around the world for immunization and strengthening health systems. 
 

:: Save Lives Now with PPE and Emergency Medical Supplies
The Biden-Harris Administration is investing in efforts to help fragile countries with their emergency response, including lifesaving medical and other supplies to tackle COVID-19 surges while strengthening their health systems, building capacity to manage surges, and preventing disease spread. We must expand our emergency responses, including by delivering lifesaving medical supplies, oxygen, diagnostics, therapeutics, and PPE. We are providing emergency assistance in 2021 to regions that need it most, including sending multiple flights and more than $100 million in health assistance to India, and supporting responses in South Asia and Latin America as countries experience surges in COVID-19 cases…
 

:: Boosting Global Supply and Supporting Surge Capacity
We must increase our investments in local production capacity for safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics, raw materials, diagnostics, and medical supplies. We will help develop and sustain a global vaccine supply network for this pandemic and the next…

The Biden-Harris Administration is investing, through the U.S. International Development Finance Corporation (DFC), in local production capacity for safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines, which will support at least 1 billion vaccine doses by the end of 2022. This includes our efforts through the Quad Vaccine Partnership of the United States, India, Japan, and Australia, and with peer Development Finance Institutions including the IFC, Proparco, and DEG to support vaccine manufacturing in Africa – for Africa. We strongly support the aim of developing a regional network of surge capacity to produce medical countermeasures, PPE, and other lifesaving treatments and supplies.

We recognize that the above immediate actions to end the pandemic contribute to our collective longer-term preparedness. We are committed to developing sustainable surge capacity in every region to scale up medical countermeasures and supply production on a “no regrets” basis at the first sign of a health crisis…

::::::

WHO Director-General’s opening remarks at the G7 Summit – 12 June 2021

12 June 2021

Thank you, Prime Minister Johnson, and greetings to everyone.    As Sir Patrick and Melinda have outlined, the pandemic is asking us many questions. We welcome and appreciate the ambition of the 100 days mission – we need bigger, faster, better for the future.

The question that every person on earth is now asking is: how and when will we end this pandemic?

We have the knowledge and tools to do it, including vaccines.

In each of your nations, public health measures in combination with vaccination is driving cases and deaths to the lowest levels since the pandemic began. But around the world, many other countries are now facing a surge in cases – and they are facing it without vaccines.

We are in the race of our lives, but it’s not a fair race, and most countries have barely left the starting line.

Our short-term targets are to vaccinate at least 10% of the population of every country by September, and at least 40% by the end of the year, as you have seen in the joint proposal by the IMF, WHO, WTO and the World Bank. To reach those targets, we need 100 million more doses right now – this month and next month – and 250 million more by September. But we must aim higher.

To truly end the pandemic, our goal must be to vaccinate at least 70% of the world’s population by the time you meet again in Germany next year. This can be done with the support of the G7 and G20, together. To do that, we need 11 billion doses.

We welcome the generous announcements you have made about donations of vaccines. Thank you. But we need more, and we need them faster. Immediate dose donations are vital, ideally through COVAX. But so is scaling up production, including through the use of technology transfer and intellectual property waivers.

There are many other lessons we all must learn about how to keep our nations and our world safer from future pandemics. Above all, at the root of the pandemic is a deficit of solidarity and sharing – of the data, information, resources, technology and tools that every nation needs to keep its people safe.

WHO believes the best way to close that deficit is with an international agreement – a treaty, convention, call it what you will – to provide the basis for improved preparedness, detection and response, and for improved cooperation to identify the origins of new pathogens. And I would like to join Boris in thanking Charles Michel. It would also provide a vital underpinning for a stronger WHO at the centre of the global health architecture.

With 194 Member States and 150 country offices, WHO has a unique global mandate, unique global reach and unique global legitimacy. The pandemic has shown that the world needs the World Health Organization more than ever.

We look to the G7 for your continued support for a stronger WHO, for a safer world. Thank you.

Global progress to end child labour has stalled

Child Labour

World Day Against Child Labour

Global progress to end child labour has stalled 

10 June 2021

   Global progress to end child labour has come to a halt for the first time in over two decades, reversing the downward trend that saw child labour fall by 94 million between 2000 and 2016. The number of children in child labour has risen to 160 million worldwide – an increase of 8.4 million children in the last four years. That means one out of every 10 children is today in child labour. To reverse this trend, the ILO and UNICEF are calling for increased spending on public services and education, decent work for adults, and stronger laws to protect children better. Find out more: http://www.ilo.org & www.unicef.org

.

Child Labour: Global estimates 2020, trends and the road forward

ILO and UNICEF

Report  10 June 2021 :: 88 pages

   Published for the first time jointly by the ILO and UNICEF, as co-custodians of Target 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goals, the report Child Labour: 2020 global estimates, trends and the road forward takes stock of where we stand in the global effort to end child labour.

PDF: https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_norm/—ipec/documents/publication/wcms_797515.pdf

Excerpt :: Executive Summary

   … The COVID-19 crisis has served as an important reminder of the need for international cooperation and partnership in overcoming global challenges. This is as true for ending child labour as for other critical development priorities in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Eliminating child labour is a task too big for any one party to solve alone. Countries must work together within the spirit of article 8 of the universally ratified ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention (No. 182).

Alliance 8.7 plays an important role in facilitating cooperation on child labour among governmental and non-governmental actors. A global partnership launched in 2016, Alliance 8.7 groups governments, multilateral organizations, workers’ organizations, employers’ organizations, non-governmental organizations, academic institutions and think tanks to find ways of accelerating action on target 8.7. The alliance focuses on three strategies: conducting research and sharing knowledge, driving  innovation, and increasing and leveraging resources.

It is urgent to put action to end child labour back on track, in line with global commitments and goals. The evidence in this report outlines the risks and points to the solutions. While ambitious measures and investments are required, the COVID-19 pandemic has amply illustrated that these are possible when the well-being of humanity is at stake. We have made a promise to children to end child labour. There is no time to lose…

Major financial institutions, corporates, governments and UN endorse launch of Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures

Governance/Regulation/Environment – Transparency

Major financial institutions, corporates, governments and UN endorse launch of Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures

:: New market-led global initiative aims to provide financial institutions and corporates with a complete picture of their environmental risks and opportunities.

:: Two Co-Chairs announced to lead the Taskforce: David Craig, CEO of Refinitiv and Group Leader of Data & Analytics Division at London Stock Exchange Group (LSEG), and Elizabeth Maruma Mrema, Executive Secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

:: Taskforce commits to delivering a framework by 2023 for organisations to report and act on evolving nature-related risks, to support a shift in global financial flows away from nature-negative outcomes and toward nature-positive outcomes.

June 4, 2021, New York – Major financial institutions, multinational corporates and the UN have endorsed the launch of a new market-led Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD), which will support business in assessing emerging nature-related risks and opportunities.

More than half of the world’s economic output – US$44tn of economic value generation – is moderately or highly dependent on nature. The recorded extinction of 83% of wild mammals and 50% of plants therefore represents significant risk to corporate and financial stability. Action for nature-positive transitions could generate up to US$10.1 trillion in annual business value and create 395 million jobs by 2030.

A report titled ‘Nature in Scope’, published today, describes how the initiative will deliver a framework for organisations to report and act on evolving nature-related risks, in order to support a shift in global financial flows away from nature-negative outcomes and towards nature-positive outcomes. A complementary report also sets out the proposed technical scope for the TNFD.

Through an inclusive approach, the initiative aims to consult with a variety of stakeholders from all regions – to develop and build on voluntary, consistent disclosures to help corporates, investors, lenders and insurance underwriters manage nature-related risks, such as new legal liabilities and systemic loss of soil fertility.

In its first year, the TNFD aims to build upon the success of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), which has become instrumental in mainstreaming the issue of climate-related financial risks. The TNFD’s framework for nature-related risks will complement the TCFD’s climate-related framework, to give companies and financial institutions a complete picture of their environmental risks.  Through its framework, the TNFD will support organisations to report and act on both their nature-related risks. The framework will be tested and refined in 2022 before its launch and dissemination in 2023. In 2021, the G7 endorsed the launch of the TNFD.

The initiative to bring together a Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures was first announced in July 2020 by the four founding partners: UNDP, UNEP FI, WWF and Global Canopy. Kicking off its work in September 2020, an Informal Working Group, comprised of 74 Members across 24 countries – including financial institutions, corporates, governments, regulators, multilaterals, NGOs and consortiums – have worked to propose practical recommendations for the scope and workplan of the TNFD, which is released today. This informal group was ably co-chaired by market-leaders: Banorte, BNP Paribas and the Green Finance Institute. UNDP and UNEP FI served as a global accelerator team to help catalyze progress.

Coronavirus [COVID-19] – WHO Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Milestones :: Perspectives :: Research

Coronavirus [COVID-19] – WHO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

Weekly Epidemiological and Operational updates
Last update: 12 Jun 2021
Confirmed cases :: 174 918 667 [week ago: 172 242 495]
Confirmed deaths :: 3 782 490 [week ago 3 709 397]
Vaccine doses administered: 2 156 550 767 [week ago: 1 638 006 899]

::::::

Weekly epidemiological update on COVID-19 – 8 June 2021
Overview
Global case and death incidences continued to decrease with over 3 million new cases and over 73 000 new deaths reported in the past week, a 15% and an 8% decrease respectively as compared to the week before. In the past week, the European and South-East Asia Regions reported marked declines in the number of new cases while the African Region reported an increase as compared to the previous week.
In this edition, a special focus update is provided on SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Interest (VOIs) and Variants of Concern (VOCs) Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351), Gamma (P.1), and Delta (B.1.617.2). This includes updates on emerging evidence surrounding the phenotypic characteristics of VOCs (transmissibility, disease severity, risk of reinfection, and impacts on diagnostics and vaccine performance), as well as updates on the geographic distribution of VOCs.

[Excerpt, p. 5]

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is screen-shot-2021-06-13-at-5.29.25-pm.png

Weekly operational update on COVID-19 – 7 June 2021
Overview
In this edition of the COVID-19 Weekly Operational Update, highlights of country-level actions and WHO support to countries include:
:: Second training of trainers on infection prevention and control (IPC) in Mauritius
:: COVAX ships an additional 559 200 doses of COVID-19 vaccines to Malaysia
:: The Hospital of Tomorrow: WHO/Europe supports Tuscany Region in Italy in hospital redesign
:: Support for COVID-19 response amidst staggering health needs in the occupied Palestinian territory, including east Jerusalem
:: Strengthening vaccine rollout preparedness for refugees in Cox’s Bazar
:: The launch of the SPRP 2021 Monitoring and Evaluation Framework and progress on a subset of indicators
:: Librarians supporting the timely dissemination of COVID-19 seroprevalence data through GOARN and a workshop on health systems for health security
:: Updates on WHO’s financing to support countries in SPRP 2021 implementation and provision of critical supplies.

POLIO Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC); WHO/OCHA Emergencies

Emergencies

POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Polio this week as of 09 June 2021
:: Today, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) launched the Polio Eradication Strategy 2022-2026: Delivering on a Promise at a virtual event, to overcome the remaining challenges to ending polio, including setbacks caused by COVID-19. Read the press release here.
:: “We need to continue supporting the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, whose surveillance capacity and ability to reach vulnerable communities are critical in many countries to prevent and respond to pandemics.” – health ministers of the G7 countries. Read more…..

Summary of new WPV and cVDPV viruses this week (AFP cases and ES positives):
:: Afghanistan: one cVDPV2 case
:: Pakistan: two WPV1 and one cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Burkina Faso: one cVDPV2 case

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::::::

GPEI Strategy 2022-2026

Polio Eradication Strategy 2022-2026: Delivering on a Promise
Pre-publication version, as of 10 June 2021
Published by the World Health Organization (WHO) on behalf of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI).
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY [excerpt]
Over the last decade, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) made steady progress on the path to eradication. Wild poliovirus types 2 and 3 (WPV2 and WPV3) were declared eradicated in 2015 and 2019, respectively; the World Health Organization (WHO) South-East Asia Region was declared free of poliovirus in 2014; and most recently, the WHO African Region was certified free of wild poliovirus (WPV) in August 2020. However, the final steps towards eradication have proven the most difficult.

The GPEI now faces programmatic and epidemiological challenges that demand new approaches to place the partnership and impacted countries on emergency footing (see Annex A). To achieve a polio-free world, the GPEI has re-envisioned the endgame pathway with an urgent call for collective ownership and accountability across the GPEI partnership and with governments, communities and all other stakeholders.

The Polio Eradication Strategy 2022–2026 offers a comprehensive set of actions that will position the GPEI to deliver on a promise that brought the world together in a collective commitment to eradicate polio. These actions, many of which are already underway in 2021, will strengthen and empower the GPEI to meet challenges head-on and achieve and sustain a polio-free world.

The GPEI will transform its approach in each region and country through five mutually reinforcing objectives that lay the foundation to achieve two elemental goals:
Goal One to permanently interrupt poliovirus transmission in the final WPV-endemic countries of Afghanistan and Pakistan, and
Goal Two to stop circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) transmission and prevent outbreaks in non-endemic countries…

THE GPEI POLIO OVERSIGHT BOARD
Chris Elias
President, Global Development Division, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
2021 Chair of the Polio Oversight Board
Seth Berkley
Chief Executive Officer, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance
Henrietta Fore
UNICEF Executive Director
Mike McGovern
Chair, International PolioPlus Committee, Rotary International
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus
WHO Director-General
Rochelle Walensky
Director, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Countries reaffirm commitment to ending polio at launch of new eradication strategy
10 June 2021 News release
Today, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) will launch the Polio Eradication Strategy 2022-2026: Delivering on a Promise at a virtual event, to overcome the remaining challenges to ending polio, including setbacks caused by COVID-19. While polio cases have fallen 99.9% since 1988, polio remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) and persistent barriers to reaching every child with polio vaccines and the pandemic have contributed to an increase in polio cases. Last year, 1226 cases of all forms of polio were recorded compared to 138 in 2018.  

In 2020, the GPEI paused polio door-to-door campaigns for four months to protect communities from the spread of COVID-19 and contributed up to 30,000 programme staff and over $100 million in polio resources to support pandemic response in almost 50 countries.

Leaders from the two countries yet to interrupt wild polio transmission—Pakistan and Afghanistan—called for renewed global solidarity and the continued resources necessary to eradicate this vaccine-preventable disease. They committed to strengthening their partnership with GPEI to improve vaccination campaigns and engagement with communities at high risk of polio.

The 2022-2026 Strategy underscores the urgency of getting eradication efforts back on track and offers a comprehensive set of actions that will position the GPEI to achieve a polio-free world. These actions, many of which are underway in 2021, include:

:: further integrating polio activities with essential health services—including routine immunization—and building closer partnerships with high-risk communities to co-design immunization events and better meet their health needs, particularly in Pakistan and Afghanistan;

:: applying a gender equality lens to the implementation of programme activities, recognizing the importance of female workers to build community trust and improve vaccine acceptance;

:: strengthening advocacy to urge greater accountability and ownership of the program at all levels, including enhanced performance measurement and engagement with new partners, such as the new Eastern Mediterranean Regional Subcommittee on Polio Eradication and Outbreaks; and,

:: implementing innovative new tools, such as digital payments to frontline health workers, to further improve the impact and efficiency of polio campaigns.

“With this new Strategy, the GPEI has clearly outlined how to overcome the final barriers to securing a polio-free world and improve the health and wellbeing of communities for generations to come,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization and member of the Polio Oversight Board. “But to succeed, we urgently need renewed political and financial commitments from governments and donors. Polio eradication is at a pivotal moment. It is important we capitalise on the momentum of the new Strategy and make history together by ending this disease.”…

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WHO/OCHA Emergencies

Editor’s Note:
WHO has apparently reorganized and fundamentally shifted how it judges and tracks “emergencies”. We found no announcement of descriptive information to share and present the webpage structure as encountered below.

Health emergencies list – WHO
The health emergencies list details the disease outbreaks, disasters and humanitarian crises where WHO plays an essential role in supporting countries to respond to and recover from emergencies with public health consequences.

Ebola outbreak, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2021

Ebola outbreak outbreak, N’Zerekore, Guinea, 2021

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic

Ebola outbreak, Equateur Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2020

Ebola outbreak, North Kivu, Ituri, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2018 – 2020

Ebola outbreak, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2018

Yemen crisis

Syria crisis

Somalia crisis

Nigeria crisis

Ebola outbreak, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2017

Zika virus disease outbreak, 2015-2016

Ebola outbreak: West Africa, 2014-2016

Iraq crisis

South Sudan crisis

Avian influenza A (H7N9) virus outbreak

Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV) outbreak

Influenza A (H1N1) virus, 2009-2010 pandemic

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UN OCHA – Current Emergencies
Current Corporate Emergencies
Ethiopia
Ethiopia Humanitarian Bulletin Issue #7 10 May – 6 June 2021
HIGHLIGHTS
:: Partners are implementing CERF-funded anticipatory action projects to mitigate the impact of drought and prevent a food security crisis.
:: The Federal and Regional Governments are preparing to implement a phased return/relocation plan for conflict-displaced people (IDPs) in various parts of the country ahead of the Kiremt/summer rainy season.

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development

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Week ending 5 June 2021 :: Number 370

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

PDF:

Lebanon

Lebanon Sinking into One of the Most Severe Global Crises Episodes, amidst Deliberate Inaction

 Beirut, June 1, 2021 – Lebanon is enduring a severe and prolonged economic depression. According to the latest World Bank Lebanon Economic Monitor (LEM) released today, the economic and financial crisis is likely to rank in the top 10, possibly top 3, most severe crises episodes globally since the mid-nineteenth century. In the face of colossal challenges, continuous policy inaction and the absence of a fully functioning executive authority threaten already dire socio-economic conditions and a fragile social peace with no clear turning point in the horizon. 

The Spring 2021 edition of the LEM, “Lebanon Sinking: To the Top 3” [see below] presents recent economic developments and examines the country’s economic outlook and possible risks. For over a year and a half, Lebanon has been facing compounded challenges: its largest peace-time economic and financial crisis, COVID-19 and the Port of Beirut explosion.

As The Deliberate Depression (LEM – Fall 2020) already laid-out, policy responses by Lebanon’s leadership to these challenges have been highly inadequate. The inadequacy is less due to knowledge gaps and quality advice and more the result of: i) a lack of political consensus over effective policy initiatives; and ii) political consensus in defense of a bankrupt economic system, which benefited a few for so long. With a history of a prolonged civil war and multiple conflicts— Lebanon is identified by the World Bank as a Fragility, Conflict & Violence (FCV) State— there is growing wariness of potential triggers to social unrest.  The increasingly dire socio-economic conditions risk systemic national failings with regional and potentially global effects. 

The World Bank estimates that in 2020 real GDP contracted by 20.3 percent, on the back of a 6.7 percent contraction in 2019. In fact, Lebanon’s GDP plummeted from close to US$55 billion in 2018 to an estimated US$33 billion in 2020, while GDP per capita fell by around 40 percent in dollar terms. Such a brutal contraction is usually associated with conflicts or wars. Monetary and financial conditions remain highly volatile; within the context of a multiple exchange rate system, the World Bank average exchange rate depreciated by 129 percent in 2020. The effect on prices have resulted in surging inflation, averaging 84.3 percent in 2020. Subject to extraordinarily high uncertainty, real GDP is projected to contract by a further 9.5 percent in 2021.

“Lebanon faces a dangerous depletion of resources, including human capital, and high skilled labor is increasingly likely to take up potential opportunities abroad, constituting a permanent social and economic loss for the country,” said Saroj Kumar Jha, World Bank Mashreq Regional Director. “Only a reform minded government, which embarks upon a credible path toward economic and financial recovery, while working closely with all stakeholders, can reverse further sinking of Lebanon and prevent more national fragmentation”…  

Lebanon Economic Monitor, Spring 2021: Lebanon Sinking (to the Top 3)

World Bank Group

Spring 2021 :: 94 pages

PDF: http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/394741622469174252/pdf/Lebanon-Economic-Monitor-Lebanon-Sinking-to-the-Top-3.pdf

THE POLICY CONTEXT

Lebanon faces a dangerous depletion of resources, including human capital since brain drain has become an increasingly desperate option. Over a year into the financial crisis, Lebanon has yet to identify, least of all embark upon, a credible path toward economic and financial recovery. In fact, Lebanon lacks a fully-functioning executive authority and is currently in the process of forming its third Government in a little over a year. Meanwhile, social discontent has spilled over to street action even under COVID-19 conditions; internal political discord and fragmentation continues; and geopolitical tensions complicate solutions. In consequence, highly skilled labor is increasingly likely to take up potential opportunities abroad, constituting a permanent social and economic loss for the country.

Lebanese authorities and the IMF began discussions in May 2020. The discussions eventually stalled as differences and inconsistencies emerged within the Lebanon team regarding the Government’s financial recovery program. IMF discussions await the formation of new Government.

The burden of the ongoing adjustment/deleveraging in the financial sector is highly regressive,  concentrated on smaller depositors, the local labor force and smaller businesses. Defacto Lirafication and haircuts on dollar deposits are ongoing despite BdL’s and banks’ official commitment to safeguarding deposits. The burden of the ongoing adjustment/deleveraging is regressive and concentrated on the smaller depositors who lack other source of savings, the local labor force that is paid in LBP, and smaller businesses. The banking sector is advocating for mechanisms that incorporate state-owned assets, gold reserves, and public real estate in order to overhaul their impaired balance sheets. This constitutes a bailout of the financial sector and is inconsistent with the restructuring principles that protect taxpayers. These  principles include bail in solutions based on a hierarchy of creditors, starting with banks’ shareholders. Government can also apply a wealth tax (on financial and real assets) as a tool to progressively restructure the financial sector.

Lebanon urgently needs to adopt and implement a credible, comprehensive and coordinated macro-financial stability strategy, within a medium-term macro-fiscal framework. This strategy would be based on: (i) a debt restructuring program that would achieve short-term fiscal space and medium-term debt sustainability; (ii) comprehensively restructuring the financial sector in order to regain solvency of the banking sector; (iii) adopting a new monetary policy framework that would regain confidence and stability in the exchange rate; (iv) a phased fiscal adjustment aimed at regaining confidence in fiscal policy; (v) growth enhancing reforms; and (vi) enhanced social protection…

Overall

Lebanon’s financial crisis stands out as a particularly arduous episode even when compared to some of the most severe crises observed since 1900. In estimating the R&R CSI for the Lebanon financial crisis, we make reasonable assumptions on its depth and duration. The results suggest that the Lebanon crisis is likely to be of the 10, possibly three, most severe global crises episodes, as observed and examined by Reinhart and Rogoff (2014) over a period surpassing a century and half. This is further confirmed when we compare select macroeconomic indicators for Lebanon with those for R&R’s relatively more recent crises.

As such, we expect the adjustment process to be more painful and to take longer, even with optimal policy measures in place. As it currently stands, however, the absence of a comprehensive and consistent adjustment strategy can only make this more difficult…

Pandemic recovery: Digital rights key to inclusive and resilient world

Digital Rights – COVID Response and Post-COVID Context

Pandemic recovery: Digital rights key to inclusive and resilient world

GENEVA (4 June 2021) – As the world rebuilds civic space during and after the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond, UN experts stress that human rights apply online, as offline, and digital rights must be a top priority.

“Despite the instrumental role of the internet and digital technologies, which have provided new avenues for the exercise of public freedoms and access to health and related information and care in particular during the COVID-19 pandemic, States continue to leverage these technologies to muzzle dissent, surveil, and quash online and offline collective action and the tech companies have done too little to avert such abuse of human rights,” the experts said.

“We are deeply concerned that these patterns of abuse, which have further accelerated under the exigencies of the pandemic, will continue and exacerbate inequalities worldwide.”

“We need to act together to embrace the fast-pace expansion of digital space and technological solutions that are safe, inclusive and rights-based,” nine U.N. human rights experts* said ahead of the annual RightsCon summit on human rights in the digital age from June 7-11.

COVID-19 recovery efforts to “build back better” must address serious threats contributing to the closing of civic space and suppression of free speech and media freedom, the experts said, along with ongoing global crises such as systemic violence, climate change, structural inequality, institutional racism, and gender-based violence.

They specifically pointed to internet shutdowns during peaceful protests, digital divides and accessibility barriers including to basic human rights and services, disinformation and misinformation; attacks independent and diverse media; algorithmic discrimination, online threats against human rights defenders, mass and targeted surveillance, cyberattacks and attempts to undermine encryption.

The experts said the pandemic had particularly heightened digital inequalities and discrimination against, among others: people of African descent, ethnic groups, minority groups and communities facing religious, and ethnic discrimination, persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, internally displaced people, people affected by extreme poverty, women and girls, migrants and refugees, LGBTQ+, gender diverse persons, human rights and environmental defenders, journalists and activists, worldwide.

They also raised concern about ongoing repression of peaceful protests around the world and an unprecedented spike in reports of child sexual abuse material online.

The experts stressed that States — and the tech sector — must take additional systemic measures so that their efforts reach those who are most at risk of being disproportionately affected. Platforms must be inclusive through engaging people in the ground and improving their investments in least developed countries. “We must leave no one behind — online or offline,” they said.

The experts reiterated the need for States to maintain their positive obligation to promote and protect human rights, including through rights-respecting regulations on tech companies. Initiatives to regulate online spaces need to be participatory and fully grounded in human rights standards. Businesses need to uphold their responsibility to respect human rights, including by reviewing their business models, and be held accountable for acts of digital repression, such as the non-transparent content takedowns and manipulation recently witnessed in various regions of the world. “The opacity that prevails in the ways content is moderated by Governments and companies reinforces global perceptions of discrimination, inefficiency and censorship. There is an urgent need for transparency”, stressed the experts.

The experts further called on companies to stop supplying governments with technologies — such as spyware tools and applications claiming to recognise faces, genders, disabilities and emotions — which reinforce risks for defenders and civil society actors when exercising their legitimate right to voice critical concerns and defend human rights. Businesses need to prevent and address these risks and avoid contributing consciously or inadvertently to further shrinking civic space.

The experts also cautioned against the repurposing of security and counter-terrorism measures, specifically the use of new technologies, data collection, surveillance and biometric technologies to securitise health and regulate a health pandemic whose effects are most severely felt by minority and groups at heightened risk. They demanded that already controversial public-private security partnerships be subjected to additional scrutiny when leveraged into the public health arena.

The expertsreiterated that “only with concerted multilateral efforts to restore solidarity and mutual trust, will we overcome the pandemic while becoming more resilient and united“. They also warned particularly against using the pandemic as an excuse to rush forward “digital transformation”, as exemplified in digital vaccine certificates, without prioritising foundational digital rights safeguards.

During the summit, the UN human rights experts will discuss a range of issues such as: “The Oceans and Maritime Space as the New Frontier to Defend Human Rights in the Expansion of Counter-Terrorism Domains”; “When States of Emergency Collide: COVID-9, Counter-Terrorism and Transnational Data Flows”, internet shutdown during peaceful protest, the digitalization of welfare systems, which may lead to excluding beneficiaries based even on minor or inconsequential irregularities and to increased targeting, with potential under inclusion of people in poverty; “XR for Everyone: Questions, Challenges, and Solutions in Support of Accessible XR”; and “Making the Right Impact: Human Rights Compliant AI”; disinformation and freedom of opinion and expression, gender justice and freedom of expression.

* The experts:

Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights while countering terrorism;

Clément Voule , Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association;

Olivier De Schutter, Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights;

David R. Boyd, Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and Environment;

Gerard Quinn, Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities;

Tlaleng Mofokeng, Special Rapporteur on the right to physical and mental health;

Irene Khan, Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression;

Mary Lawlor, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders;

Dante Pesce (Chairperson), Surya Deva (Vice-Chairperson), Elżbieta Karska, Githu Muigai, and Anita Ramasastry the Working Group on Business and Human Rights

Tracking Investment to Safeguard the World’s Cultural and Natural Heritage

Heritage Stewardship

Tracking Investment to Safeguard the World’s Cultural and Natural Heritage – Results of the 2020 UIS Survey on Expenditure on Cultural and Natural Heritage (SDG Indicator 11.4.1)

UNESCO – Jun 2021 :: 12 pages

Introduction [excepts]

   Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Indicator 11.4.1 measures expenditure on cultural and natural heritage and is the first cultural indicator developed for the Agenda 2030. Target 11.4 explicitly calls on countries to “strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage” and data for Indicator 11.4.1 is one step on the way there…

   Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, 62 countries responded to the UIS questionnaire. However, this report is based on analysis of the 29 countries able to provide sufficient data to calculate the indicator. Of the 33 countries for which data could not be used, 13 indicated that they did not collect these data. The UIS was not able to use the data received from the remaining 20 countries due to incompleteness, inadequate data coverage, or confidentiality or data quality issues.

UNESCO Institute for Statistics Releases Key Findings in New Cultural and Natural Heritage Report

06/2/2021

The UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) has released the first set of data for Indicator 11.4.1 related to culture for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Agenda 2030. The results and analysis are available in a new report, Tracking Investment to Safeguard the World’s Cultural and Natural Heritage.

Indicator 11.4.1 is defined as “total per capita expenditure on the preservation, protection and conservation of all cultural and natural heritage, by source of funding (public, private), type of heritage (cultural, natural) and level of government (national, regional and local/municipal).”

Crucial Role of Collecting Data in the Midst of COVID

Activities associated with preserving our cultural and natural heritage are multifaceted and complex with many benefits to society ranging from employing cultural workers to educational activities in museums. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in major impacts for the culture sector and for heritage preservation, as tourism fell and some 95% of the world’s museums closed during the crisis in April 2020. World Heritage sites all around the world have been impacted by the pandemic. Data has a crucial role to play in providing information so that we can ensure that our cultural and natural heritage remain strong for generations to come.

This first survey to collect data on culture and natural heritage expenditure took place between June 2020 and February 2021, and while the pandemic complicated reporting for many countries, these data mark an important first step in fulfilling global commitments to safeguarding our natural and cultural heritage for the Agenda 2030. Indicator 11.4.1 is the first indicator of the UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators framework indicating expenditure on heritage. Going forward, the UIS has planned a series of webinars and will offer additional technical support to Member States to increase survey participation, data quality and that would also contribute to the implementation of the UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators.

Key Results and Analysis

Sixty-two countries responded to the survey and 29 had sufficiently robust data of a high enough quality to include in the indicator calculations. Of these, 28 countries were able to report public expenditure on cultural and natural heritage and six (Finland, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden) were able to provide data to calculate the entire indicator.

Half of the countries (13 countries) reporting data on public expenditures were from Europe and Northern America. They spent, on average, PPP$ 75 per capita to protect heritage in 2019, ranging from PPP$ 6 in Moldova to PPP$ 162 in Hungary.

An analysis of expenditure by level of government revealed that of the seven countries reporting spending by local government, (Belarus, Brazil, Ecuador, France, Hungary, Peru, Turkey) expenditures were higher than the national or federal level in five of them (Belarus, Brazil, France, Turkey, Spain), pointing to the importance of municipalities in preserving heritage.

Comparing public expenditure on cultural and natural heritage against all expenditure on cultural and natural activities showed a wide range of outcomes within each SDG region. The five reporting countries from Latin America and the Caribbean (Brazil, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Nicaragua), for example, spent less than PPP$ 20 per capita on cultural and natural heritage, though the proportion of heritage spending within culture ranged from 75% in Ecuador to 20% in Mexico.  

Moving Ahead: UIS Initiatives

Looking forward, this survey is a key step towards demonstrating the multifaceted contribution of culture to sustainable development – a crucial endeavor in contributing to the UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators in the run-up to the UNESCO Global Conference on Cultural Policies and Sustainable Development – Mondiacult II in 2022.

The UIS will organize a meeting in July 2021 with countries and selected international agency/organization representatives to share best practices for collecting data and to identify compilation issues and to strengthen its alignment with the UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators. A second data collection cycle is planned for 2021 and to support countries during this second wave also to support the pilot phase of implementation of the UNESCO Culture|2030 Indicators. The UIS is planning five webinars in September 2021 to provide instructions on the completion of the survey and guidance on compilation.