The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship :: Sustainable Development __________________________________________________ Week ending 10 April 2021 :: Number 362

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to: David R. Curry Editor GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents :: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below] :: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF] :: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates :: Journal Watch – Key articles

First Comprehensive Global Analysis of COVID-19 Travel Restrictions, Border Closures Weighs Future Impacts on Mobility

COVID – Global Mobility

First Comprehensive Global Analysis of COVID-19 Travel Restrictions, Border Closures Weighs Future Impacts on Mobility
Media Release
2021-04-08 07:24
GENEVA/WASHINGTON – While the overall picture of cross-border human mobility in 2020 is of movement dramatically curtailed as a result of measures imposed by governments since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new report shows a varying reality over time and by region, with particularly harsh effects for refugees and other migrants who move out of necessity.

The report resulting from the collaboration by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) marks the first comprehensive analysis of the travel measures and border closures that governments around the world took during 2020—which at their peak in mid-December exceeded 111,000 in place at one time. The report, COVID-19 and the State of Global Mobility in 2020, results from MPI analysis of IOM’s COVID-19 Mobility Impacts platform, which collects all of the actions taken by countries and subnational authorities to close international borders, restrict travel between particular locations, impose quarantines and health requirements for travellers, and establish “travel bubbles” and other arrangements.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has gravely impacted global mobility, stranding millions of people, migrant labourers, family members or international students overseas,” said IOM Director General António Vitorino. “This report draws out these dynamics over the course of 2020 and highlights the ways governments are attempting to restart mobility in 2021 and beyond.”

Cross-border mobility in 2020 can be divided into three phases, the report’s authors find:
:: January to May: Mobility lockdowns. In this first phase, countries introduced a raft of national lockdowns, other travel restrictions and health requirements to respond to the fast-evolving public health crisis. The scale of border closures was unprecedented, many occurring with limited coordination. By the end of March, governments had issued or extended 43,300 travel measures. Movements of all kinds were dramatically curtailed. For instance, the numbers of passengers on international flights in April and May were down by 92 per cent relative to the same months in 2019.

:: June to September: Phased reopening. This period brought the staggered reopening of some points of entry, especially of airports. Travel bans were increasingly replaced by health measures, including certificates of pre-departure COVID-19 tests, quarantine measures or health declarations. During this phase, different strategies across the world began to crystallize. This was obvious most clearly in the divergent approaches of island countries: as New Zealand and Australia pursued virus-elimination strategies and maintained border closures, others such as the Caribbean islands opened up to tourism.

:: October to December: Responses to new outbreaks and virus mutations. The remainder of the year was a mixed picture, as countries sought to replace travel restrictions with health requirements, while battling a second (and in some cases, third) wave of infections and grappling with the emergence of new variants of the virus. Some countries, including Chile, Mexico and the United Arab Emirates, opened even to tourists. Health certificates became the most common health-related travel measure.

Three shifts in cross-border mobility were particularly visible, and could persist in the years ahead:
:: Widening gulf between movers and non-movers. The pandemic has deeply curtailed the mobility prospects of some groups who move out of necessity, including refugees and migrant workers, while having little effect on business travellers and others with the resources and opportunity to cross borders for work, family or tourism. This gulf is especially likely to persist if travel begins to favour those who have been vaccinated or tested, or if reliance on digital health records makes a person’s ability to travel dependent on digital access and literacy.

:: Greater socioeconomic vulnerabilities. The pandemic has amplified the socioeconomic vulnerability of those who depend on mobility for survival. Job losses have hit migrant workers hard, especially since in many countries they often work in sectors particularly disrupted by pandemic response measures or with a higher infection risk.

:: Amplified relationships of dependence and exploitation. Restrictions on movement have increased the dependence of many migrants on intermediaries and facilitators, from employment agencies to smugglers. Even as fast-changing travel restrictions have increased the demand for smuggling services among people desperate to flee violence, natural disasters and economic deprivation, or to be able to return home, they have pushed smugglers to use more dangerous routes and raise their prices – exposing migrants and refugees to an increased risk of exploitation and trafficking.

The report examines the future of mobility as countries begin to emerge slowly from the pandemic, finding no easy or one-size-fits-all answers.

“More than a year on from the onset of the pandemic, it remains an open question what role border closures, travel restrictions and health-related travel requirements should play in a pandemic management response,” said MPI President Andrew Selee. “As new strains of the virus emerge, governments face the challenge of developing risk mitigation strategies that move beyond the blunt tools of border closures and travel bans. They also need to avoid unilateral responses and work with other governments and international organizations to develop well-planned border health policies.”

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COVID-19 and the State of Global Mobility in 2020
IOM
2021 :: 63 pages ISSN: 978-92-9068-950-8
PDF: https://publications.iom.int/system/files/pdf/covid-19-and-the-state-of-global.pdf
Description:
The year 2020 was a landmark for human mobility, with dramatically reduced cross-border movements of all kinds. The COVID-19 pandemic decimated tourism and business travel; severely curtailed labour migration; and dampened movement of all stripes, from that of international students to family reunification. The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has been tracking the surge in travel restrictions, border closures and health-related travel requirements imposed by governments since the onset of the pandemic. This report, produced through collaboration between the IOM and the Migration Policy Institute (MPI), marks the first comprehensive analysis of these data to understand how the pandemic has reshaped border management and human mobility – and what the lasting ramifications may be throughout 2021 and beyond.

The Potential Human Cost of the Use of Weapons in Outer Space and the Protection Afforded by International Humanitarian Law

Space – Weapons Use

The Potential Human Cost of the Use of Weapons in Outer Space and the Protection Afforded by International Humanitarian Law
09 April 2021 -ICRC
While space objects have been employed for military purposes since the dawn of the space era, the weaponization of outer space would increase the likelihood of hostilities in outer space, with potentially significant impacts for civilians on earth.

The use of weapons in outer space – be it through kinetic or non-kinetic means, using space- and/or ground-based weapon systems – could have significant impacts on civilians on earth. This is because technology enabled by space systems permeates most aspects of civilian life, making the potential consequences of attacks on space systems a matter of humanitarian concern.
In line with its humanitarian mission and mandate, the International Committee of the Red Cross submits this position paper to the United Nations Secretary-General to contribute its expertise to the discussion on the issues outlined in General Assembly Resolution 75/36.

The paper lays out:
:: the potential human cost of the use of weapons in outer space,
:: the existing limits to such use under international law, notably the Outer Space Treaty, the UN Charter and international humanitarian law, including prohibitions and limitations on the use of certain weapons, means and methods of warfare,
:: conclusions and recommendations that States are invited to consider.

The ICRC recommends that future national and multinational discussions and processes acknowledge:
:: the potentially significant human cost for civilians on earth of the use of weapons in outer space
:: the protection afforded by the IHL rules that restrict belligerents’ choice of means and methods of warfare, including in outer space, on the understanding that acknowledging the applicability of IHL neither legitimizes the weaponization of or hostilities in outer space, nor in any way encourages or justifies the use of force in outer space.

POLIO Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC); WHO/OCH Emergencies

Emergencies

POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Polio this week as of 07 April 2021
:: The GPEI has published a new document meant to provide guidance on tOPV temperature management procedures, which differ from those used in mOPV2 response to poliovirus type 2 events and outbreaks. The document is available here.

Summary of new WPV and cVDPV viruses this week (AFP cases and ES positives):
:: Afghanistan: five cVDPV2 cases and eight cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Pakistan: two WPV1 and three cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Burkina Faso: one cVDPV2 case
:: Côte d’Ivoire: four cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Liberia: one cVDPV2 positive environmental sample
:: Sierra Leone: one cVDPV2 case

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::::::

WHO/OCHA Emergencies

Editor’s Note:
Continuing with this edition, we include information about the last apparent update evident on the WHO emergency country webpages, recognizing almost universal and significant interims since last update regardless of the level of the emergency listed.

WHO Grade 3 Emergencies [to 10 Apr 2021]

Democratic Republic of the Congo – No new digest announcements [Last apparent update: 12 Jan 2021]
Mozambique floods – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 3 November 2020]
Nigeria – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 29 Jun 2020]
Somalia – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 17 July 2020]
South Sudan – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 4 February 2020]
Syrian Arab Republic – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 24 October 2020]
Yemen – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 30 June 2020]

::::::

WHO Grade 2 Emergencies [to 10 Apr 2021]
Malawi
:: The Malaria Vaccine Pilot Implementation Programme two years on in Malawi – Increasi… 07 April 2021

Afghanistan – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 5 July 2020]
Angola – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 16 March 2021]
Burkina Faso – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 01 avril 2021]
Burundi – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 04 July 2019]
Cameroon – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 22 August 2019]
Central African Republic – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 12 June 2018]
Ethiopia – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 22 August 2019]
Iran floods 2019 – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 2 March 2020]
Iraq – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 25 March 2021]
Libya – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 7 October 2019]
Measles in Europe – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 16-12-2020]
MERS-CoV – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 8 July 2019]
Mozambique – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 03 November 2020]
Myanmar – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 23 March 2021]
Niger– No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update:06 mars 2021]
occupied Palestinian territory – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 4 September 2019]
HIV in Pakistan – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 27 August 2019]
Sao Tome and Principe Necrotizing Cellulitis (2017) – No new digest announcements
Sudan – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 24 June 2020]
Ukraine – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 1 May 2019]
Zimbabwe – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 10 May 2019]

::::::

WHO Grade 1 Emergencies [to 10 Apr 2021]

Chad – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 30 June 2018]
Djibouti – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 25 novembre 2020]
Kenya – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 06 March 2021]
Mali – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 3 May 2017]
Namibia – viral hepatitis – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 20 July 2018]
Tanzania – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 21 October 2020]

::::::
::::::

UN OCHA – Current Emergencies
COVID-19 – No new digest announcements identified

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::::::

As COVID-19 Reveals Immoral Inequities in Health System, Secretary-General Observance Message Calls for Applying Policies, Assigning Resources to Ensure Everyone Thrives

As COVID-19 Reveals Immoral Inequities in Health System, Secretary-General Observance Message Calls for Applying Policies, Assigning Resources to Ensure Everyone Thrives
5 April 2021 SG/SM/20672
Following is UN Secretary-General António Guterres’ message for World Health Day, observed on 7 April:
On this World Health Day, we highlight the inequalities and injustices of our health systems.

The COVID-19 crisis has revealed how unequal our societies are.  Within countries, illness and death from COVID-19 has been higher among people and communities that contend with poverty, unfavourable living and working conditions, discrimination and social exclusion.

Globally, the vast majority of vaccine doses administered have been in a few wealthy countries or those producing vaccines.  Thanks to the COVAX initiative, more nations are now beginning to receive vaccine supplies, but most people in low- and middle-income countries still must watch and wait.

Such inequities are immoral, and they are dangerous for our health, our economies and our societies.  As we recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, we must implement policies and allocate resources so all can enjoy the same health outcomes.  That means achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.  And it means delivering universal health coverage so everyone, everywhere, can thrive.

On this World Health Day, let us commit to work together for a healthy, equitable world.

COVAX reaches over 100 economies, 42 days after first international delivery

COVAX reaches over 100 economies, 42 days after first international delivery
:: The COVAX Facility has now delivered life-saving vaccines to over 100 economies since making its first international delivery to Ghana on February 24th
:: So far, more than 38 million doses of vaccines from manufacturers AstraZeneca, Pfizer-BioNTech and Serum Institute of India (SII) have now been delivered, including 61 economies eligible for vaccines through the Gavi COVAX Advance Market Commitment
:: COVAX aims to supply vaccines to all participating economies that have requested vaccines, in the first half of 2021, despite some delays in planned deliveries for March and April.

GENEVA/ NEW YORK/ OSLO, 8 April 2021 – More than one hundred economies have received life-saving COVID-19 vaccines from COVAX, the global mechanism for equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines. The milestone comes 42 days after the first COVAX doses were shipped and delivered internationally, to Ghana on February 24th.

COVAX has now delivered more than 38 million doses across six continents, supplied by three manufacturers, AstraZeneca, Pfizer-BioNTech and the Serum Institute of India (SII). Of the over 100 economies reached, 61 are among the 92 lower-income economies receiving vaccines funded through the Gavi COVAX Advance Market Commitment (AMC).

Despite reduced supply availability in March and April – the result of vaccine manufacturers scaling and optimising their production processes in the early phase of the rollout, as well as increased demand for COVID-19 vaccines in India – COVAX expects to deliver doses to all participating economies that have requested vaccines in the first half of the year.

“In under four months since the very first mass vaccination outside a clinical setting anywhere in the world, it is tremendously gratifying that the roll-out of COVAX doses has already reached one hundred countries,” said Dr Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. “COVAX may be on track to deliver to all participating economies in the first half of the year yet we still face a daunting challenge as we seek to end the acute stage of the pandemic: we will only be safe when everybody is safe and our efforts to rapidly accelerate the volume of doses depend on the continued support of governments and vaccine manufacturers. As we continue with the largest and most rapid global vaccine rollout in history, this is no time for complacency.”

“COVAX has given the world the best way to ensure the fastest, most equitable rollout of safe and effective vaccines to all at-risk people in every country on the planet,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. “If we are going to realize this great opportunity, countries, producers and the international system must come together to prioritize vaccine supply through COVAX. Our collective future, literally, depends on it.”

“This is a significant milestone in the fight against COVID-19. Faced with the rapid spread of COVID-19 variants, global access to vaccines is fundamentally important to reduce the prevalence of the disease, slow down viral mutation, and hasten the end of the pandemic,” said Dr Richard Hatchett, CEO of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI). “The extraordinary scientific achievements of the last year must now be matched by an unprecedented effort to protect the most vulnerable, so the global community must remain firmly focused on reducing the equity gap in COVID-19 vaccine distribution.”

“In just a month and a half, the ambition of granting countries access to COVID vaccines is becoming a reality, thanks to the outstanding work of our partners in the COVAX Facility,” said Henrietta Fore, UNICEF Executive Director. “However, this is no time to celebrate; it is time to accelerate. With variants emerging all over the world, we need to speed up global rollout. To do this, we need governments, along with other partners, to take necessary steps to increase supply, including by simplifying barriers to intellectual property rights, eliminating direct and indirect measures that restrict exports of COVID-19 vaccines, and donating excess vaccine doses as quickly as possible.”

According to its latest supply forecast, COVAX expects to deliver at least 2 billion doses of vaccines in 2021. In order to reach this goal, the COVAX Facility will continue to diversify its portfolio further, and will announce new agreements with vaccine manufacturers in due course.

Furthermore, in March it was announced that the United States government will host the launch event for the 2021 Gavi COVAX AMC Invest Opportunity to catalyse further commitment and support for accelerated access to vaccines for AMC-supported economies. An additional US$2 billion is required in 2021 to finance and secure up to a total of 1.8 billion donor-funded doses of vaccines. COVAX is also working to secure additional sourcing of vaccines in the form of dose-sharing from higher income countries…

We need speed and simplicity to remove barriers to the acquisition, manufacture and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines globally :: Statement by UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore

We need speed and simplicity to remove barriers to the acquisition, manufacture and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines globally
Statement by UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore
NEW YORK, 6 APRIL 2021
…“But the fight is not yet over. Variants are emerging all over the world, and with each, the risk of a massive global setback.

“At the current rate, there is simply not enough vaccine supply to meet demand. And the supply available is concentrated in the hands of too few. Some countries have contracted enough doses to vaccinate their populations several times, while other countries have yet to receive even their first dose. This threatens us all. The virus and its mutations will win.

“In order to get ahead of the virus, and to shift gears, we must build on a strategy of vaccinating frontline workers but drive towards a strategy that truly enables equitable access for all. We urge governments, businesses and partners to take three urgent actions:

“First, simplify Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) through voluntary and proactive licensing by IPR holders. But this alone won’t increase production. Unlike drug manufacture, vaccine production involves a complex manufacturing process with multiple components and steps. IPR holders would need to provide technology partnerships to accompany IP licenses, proactively share know-how and sub-contract to manufacturers without undue geographic or volume restrictions. This challenge requires not forced IP waivers but proactive partnership and cooperation. Recent manufacturing partnerships such as Pfizer-BioNtech; AZ-SII, J&J- Merck and J&J-Aspen are encouraging examples. UNICEF urges others to follow suit, to increase the scale and geographic diversity of manufacturing capacity.

“While markets alone can’t guarantee innovation benefits all, voluntary licensing, pooled funds and multilateral mechanisms such as COVAX are an effective and realistic way for product developers and manufacturers to collaborate, innovate, and encourage equitable access.

“Second, we need to end vaccine nationalism. Governments should remove direct and indirect export- and import-control measures that block, restrict or slow down exports of COVID-19 vaccines, ingredients and supplies. Viruses respect no borders. Defeating COVID-19 in each of our home countries also means defeating it around the world by ensuring a steady flow of vaccines and supplies to all.

“Finally, Governments that have contracted to receive more ‘future doses’ than required to vaccinate their entire adult populations this year, should immediately loan, release or donate most or all excess contracted doses for 2021 to COVAX, so they can be allocated equitably among other countries.

“In addition, countries with a sufficient, current supply of manufactured doses should consider donating at least 5% of their available manufactured doses right away, and commit to making further contributions on a continued, rolling basis throughout the year, scaling up their contributions in line with rising supply. Confirming these dose-sharing commitments now will enhance predictability, accelerate equitable access, and help stabilize the global vaccine market.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has made clear to us all that no one is safe until everyone is safe. But equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines is within our grasp. We have proven that the world can rally to do the unthinkable, and we need to do it again. The sooner we do, the sooner our lives, and the lives of our children, will go back to normal.”

Coronavirus [COVID-19] – WHO Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Coronavirus [COVID-19] – WHO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

Weekly Epidemiological and Operational updates
Last update: 23 January 2021
Confirmed cases :: 134 308 070 [week ago: 129 902 402] [two weeks ago: 125 781 957]
Confirmed deaths :: 2 907 944 [week ago: 2 831 815] [two weeks ago: 2 759 432]
Countries, areas or territories with cases :: 223

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Weekly operational update on COVID-19 – 5 April 2021
Overview
In this edition of the Weekly Operational Update on COVID-19, highlights of country-level actions and WHO support to Member States include:
:: Training on the collection and electronic reporting of COVID-19 data in Burundi
:: Strengthening operational support and logistics in the western Balkans
:: WHO hears from some of the first to be vaccinated in Somalia
:: The Solomon Islands begins their COVID-19 vaccination campaign with doses supplied by the COVAX Facility
:: Outcomes on a global study of digital crisis interaction among Gen Z and Millenials
:: The Strategic Preparedness and Response Plan (SPRP) 2021 resource requirements and progress made to continue investing in the COVID-19 response and for building the architecture to prepare for, prevent and mitigate future health emergencies
:: Updates on WHO/PAHO procured items, Partners Platform, participation in the Unity Studies, and select indicators from the COVID-19 Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

Weekly epidemiological update on COVID-19 – 6 April 2021
Overview
Globally, new COVID-19 cases rose for a sixth consecutive week, with over 4 million new cases reported in the last week. The number of new deaths also increased by 11% compared to last week, with over 71 000 new deaths reported.
[No variants of concern overview included]

The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 3 April 2021 :: Number 361

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles

Facing Biggest International Tests in Decades, Humankind Must Keep Striving for Better World, Secretary-General Says upon Receiving International Four Freedoms Award

Four Freedoms

Facing Biggest International Tests in Decades, Humankind Must Keep Striving for Better World, Secretary-General Says upon Receiving International Four Freedoms Award
31 March 2021 SG/SM/20665
Following are the remarks of UN Secretary-General António Guterres on receiving the International Four Freedoms Award, today:
On behalf of the women and men of the United Nations, thank you for this high honour. This International Four Freedoms Award is especially meaningful given its deep connection to both President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt.

Every day from my office at United Nations Headquarters in New York, I see a beautiful site. It’s called Four Freedoms Park — and it stands on the edge of Roosevelt Island on the East River. To my eye, it is a lighthouse. It is a daily guide and reminder that even through the darkest storms, we have a shared destination.

As the Universal Declaration of Human Rights puts it so well: “the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people.” “The highest aspiration” — in other words, achieving those fundamental freedoms is both a goal that is paramount and a struggle that is never-ending.

The mission of the United Nations is a constant work in progress, for progress. For more than 75 years — around the world and around the clock — United Nations personnel have strived to make those rights real in the lives of people. We know that cause belongs to every one of us. It takes us all. Especially now.

Today, we are facing the biggest international tests since the idea of the United Nations was little more than a dream in the eyes of Franklin Roosevelt and others. The COVID-19 pandemic has unleashed new storms. A global health crisis. Economic catastrophe — with a disproportionate impact on the world’s women. A human rights emergency. New waves of hate, disinformation and outright lies.

At the same time, we are also confronting a planetary emergency. Accelerating climate change. Growing pollution. Collapsing biodiversity. All of this threatens the environment on which everyone’s future depends.

But through all of these storms, the lighthouse still points the way home. We can get there with conviction, commitment and cooperation. To the cynics who dismissed such goals as too lofty, FDR had a ready reply. It is true, he said, that “great teachings are not perfectly lived up to today. But I would rather be a builder than a wrecker.”

As Prime Minister Rutte so eloquently put it, this Award is indeed an incentive for us to keep building. It will inspire all of us to keep pushing. To keep striving. And to keep working for a better world — together.

Myanmar: Joint Statement by UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict & the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children

Myanmar

Myanmar: Joint Statement by UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict & the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children
Thursday, 1 April 2021
The UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, Virginia Gamba, and the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children, Dr Najat Maalla M’jid condemn in the strongest possible terms the ongoing violence against civilians, including children, in Myanmar since the military coup on 1 February.

The SRSGs are alarmed by the number of children who have lost their lives or have been injured as a result of the violence. As of 31 March, at least 44 children have been documented as killed according to UN funds and programs on the ground, including a 7-year-old girl shot while in her home. Countless other boys and girls have been seriously injured.

The SRSGs also strongly condemn the widespread attacks on schools and hospitals and protected personnel, with 35 incidents documented including arrests and violence against teachers and health personnel, which prevent life-saving interventions from reaching civilians. They further condemn the military use of education and health facilities, with more than 120 incidents documented.

Moreover, UN funds and programs on the ground have indicated that at least 900 children and young people have been arbitrarily detained. Although many of these have been released, many more are still held without access to legal counsel. This is in clear violation of international law which states that detention of children should only be used as a measure of last resort, for the shortest period possible and legal support should be provided to all children in contact with the justice system.

“We remind the Tatmadaw and the police in Myanmar that any use of force must be necessary and proportionate and not in contravention of international humanitarian and human rights law. We further urge them to stop the detention of children as clearly stated in the Convention on the Rights of the Child. We call on the Tatmadaw to halt widespread violence against children in any manifestation, to refrain from forcefully using or detaining children, to hold perpetrators of violence against children accountable and to uphold and respect Myanmar’s Child Laws. The children of Myanmar deserve no less.”

The two Special Representatives further express their deep concern over the longer-term effects of the current events in Myanmar on the physical and mental wellbeing of children and their families. The longer the current situation of widespread violence continuous, the more it will contribute to a continuous state of distress and toxic stress for children, which can have a lifelong impact on their mental and physical health.

Echoing the Secretary-General’s urgent appeal to the military in Myanmar to refrain from violence and repression and to hold those responsible for the serious human rights violations committed in the country accountable, SRSG Maalla M’jid and SRSG Gamba call on the Tatmadaw and defense and security forces in Myanmar to immediately cease excessive force and ensure the protection of civilians, particularly children from all such related violence.

IPU reports sharp increase in abuse against parliamentarians, driven largely by Myanmar

Parliamentarians – Human Rights

IPU reports sharp increase in abuse against parliamentarians, driven largely by Myanmar
Tue, 30/03/2021 – 11:54
The IPU Committee on the Human Rights of Parliamentarians is monitoring a record 601 cases of alleged violations against parliamentarians around the world. This represents a significant uptick compared to 552 cases in December 2020. The caseload includes many new claims, particularly from Myanmar and Turkey.
The committee took decisions on these and a number of other cases of alleged abuse of parliamentarians in Afghanistan, Belarus, Burundi, Colombia, Eritrea, Gabon, Mauritania, Mongolia, Thailand, Togo and Venezuela [see Decisions summary below]:

164th session of the Committee on the Human Rights of Parliamentarians
Decisions of the Committee on the Human Rights of Parliamentarians
Virtual session, 8 to 20 March 2021
DH/2021/164/R.1
Africa
Burundi: Mr. Pasteur Mpawenayo
Eritrea: 11 parliamentarians
Gabon: Mr. Justin Ndoundangoye
Mauritania: Mr. Mohamed Ould Ghadda
Mauritania: Mr. Biram Dah Abeid
Togo: Mr. Agbéyomé Kodjo

Americas
Colombia: Mr. Luis Carlos Galán Sarmiento
Colombia: Mr. Jorge Tadeo Lozano Osorio
Colombia: Mr. Alvaro Araujo Castro
Venezuela: 134 parliamentarians

Asia
Afghanistan: Two parliamentarians
Mongolia: Mr. Zorig Sanjasuuren
Myanmar: 39 parliamentarians
Thailand: Mr. Jatuporn Prompan

Europe
Belarus: Mr. Anatoly Lebedko
Turkey: 64 parliamentarians

The IPU is the global organization of national parliaments. It was founded more than 130 years ago as the first multilateral political organization in the world, encouraging cooperation and dialogue between all nations. Today, the IPU comprises 179 national Member Parliaments and 13 regional parliamentary bodies. It promotes democracy and helps parliaments become stronger, younger, gender-balanced and more diverse. It also defends the human rights of parliamentarians through a dedicated committee made up of MPs from around the world.

U.S. – Executive Order on the Termination of Emergency With Respect to the International Criminal Court

ICC International Criminal Court

Executive Order on the Termination of Emergency With Respect to the International Criminal Court

April 01, 2021   Presidential Actions

…I, JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR., President of the United States of America, find that, although the United States continues to object to the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) assertions of jurisdiction over personnel of such non-States Parties as the United States and its allies absent their consent or referral by the United Nations Security Council and will vigorously protect current and former United States personnel from any attempts to exercise such jurisdiction, the threat and imposition of financial sanctions against the Court, its personnel, and those who assist it are not an effective or appropriate strategy for addressing the United States’ concerns with the ICC.

Accordingly, I hereby terminate the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13928 of June 11, 2020 (Blocking Property of Certain Persons Associated With the International Criminal Court), and revoke that order, and further order:

Section 1.  In light of the revocation of Executive Order 13928, the suspension of entry as immigrants and nonimmigrants of individuals meeting the criteria set forth in section 1(a) of that order will no longer be in effect as of the date of this order and such individuals will no longer be treated as persons covered by Presidential Proclamation 8693 of July 24, 2011 (Suspension of Entry of Aliens Subject to United Nations Security Council Travel Bans and International Emergency Economic Powers Act Sanctions)…

 

The ICC welcomes the decision by the US Government ending sanctions and visa restrictions against ICC personnel
Press Release  2 April 2021
The International Criminal Court (“ICC” or the “Court”) welcomes the decision by the US Government to revoke Executive Order 13928, ending sanctions against the ICC Prosecutor, Fatou Bensouda, and a senior staff member of her office, Phakiso Mochochoko, as well as visa restrictions on certain ICC personnel.

The Court is mindful that the United States has traditionally made important contributions to the cause of international criminal justice. The Court stands ready to reengage with the US in the continuation of that tradition based on mutual respect and constructive engagement.

In the fulfilment of its independent and impartial judicial mandate, the Court acts strictly within the confines of the Rome Statute, as a Court of last resort, in a manner complementary to national jurisdictions. The Court relies on the support and cooperation of its States Parties, representing all regions of the world, and of the international community more broadly.

Global Gender Gap Report 2021

Global Gender Gap Report 2021

World Economic Forum – Insight Report

30 March 2021  :: 405 pages

PDF: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GGGR_2021.pdf

   Another generation of women will have to wait for gender parity, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report 2021. As the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to be felt, closing the global gender gap has increased by a generation from 99.5 years to 135.6 years.

Pandemic Pushes Back Gender Parity by a Generation, Report Finds

31 Mar 2021

· Another generation of women must wait for gender parity as an extra 36 years are added to the time remaining to close the gender gap

· Despite progress in education and health, women face economic hurdles, declining political participation and workplace challenges

· Iceland remains the world’s most gender-equal country, followed by Finland, Norway, New Zealand and Sweden

· Report calls for strategies and polices that emphasize investment in the care sector, equal hiring practices and skills development

· Discover the full report, infographics and more information here: wef.ch/gendergap21

Geneva, Switzerland, 31 March 2021 – Another generation of women will have to wait for gender parity, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report 2021. As the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to be felt, closing the global gender gap has increased by a generation from 99.5 years to 135.6 years.

Progress towards gender parity is stalling in several large economies and industries. This is partly due to women being more frequently employed in sectors hardest hit by lockdowns combined with the additional pressures of providing care at home.

The report, now in its 15th year, benchmarks the evolution of gender-based gaps in four areas: economic participation and opportunity; educational attainment; health and survival; and political empowerment. It also examines the drivers of gender gaps and outlines the policies and practices needed for a gender-inclusive recovery.

The deterioration in 2021 is partly attributed to a widening political gender gap in several large population countries. Despite over half of the 156 indexed countries registering an improvement, women still hold only 26.1% of parliamentary seats and 22.6% of ministerial positions worldwide. On its current trajectory, the political gender gap is expected to take 145.5 years to close, compared to 95 years in the 2020 edition of the report, an increase of over 50%…

Mali and UNESCO receive symbolic reparation on behalf of international community for destruction of Timbuktu’s mausoleums

Heritage Stewardship

Mali and UNESCO receive symbolic reparation on behalf of international community for destruction of Timbuktu’s mausoleums

Press release  03/30/2021

Almost a decade after the destruction of the mausoleums at Timbuktu, a UNESCO World Heritage site, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has awarded a symbolic one euro to the Government of Mali and UNESCO for the damage suffered by the Malian people and the international community as a whole as a result of the destruction of Timbuktu’s cultural property in 2012.

This gesture follows the ICC’s conviction of Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi for his responsibility in the destruction of several cultural properties in Timbuktu, a site inscribed on the World Heritage List since 1988. Between June and July 2012, during the occupation of northern Mali by armed groups, several mausoleums as well as the sacred gate of the Sidi Yahia Mosque were destroyed, causing consternation in the international community.

“Mali’s age-old heritage was targeted because it embodied the living soul of a society and a people. In the face of fanaticism, the Malians have given a lesson in tolerance, dialogue and peace. Today, attacks on cultural heritage continue, in the Sahel, in Iraq, Syria, Yemen and Libya. We must therefore sustain the global mobilization that can be modelled on what has been done in Mali,” said Audrey Azoulay, UNESCO Director-General.

Upon referral by the government in Bamako, the ICC opened a war crimes investigation. On 27 September 2016, it convicted Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi. He was handed a nine-year prison term and ordered to pay 2.7 million euros in reparations to the victims, including the community of Timbuktu, the people of Mali and the international community that rallied around the reconstruction, a task that was completed in 2015.

Individual and collective reparations began last January, in application of the ICC’s decisions. Considering the priceless and universal value of the destroyed buildings, the ICC ordered that a symbolic euro be paid to the Malian State and UNESCO respectively. 

The Organization mobilized with the support of the European Union and Switzerland for the reconstruction of the ancient mausoleums, the rehabilitation of the three mosques of Djingareyber, Sankore and Sidi Yahia, and the safeguarding of the ancient manuscripts, of which nearly 4,200 had been burnt or stolen. UNESCO’s action was also made possible by a close partnership with the Malian authorities, the local communities and the Timbuktu masons’ guild, and the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA).

Mali’s Head of State, Bah Ndaw, declared that “the global mobilization on this issue advanced the legal framework for protection with the inclusion of heritage protection in MINUSMA’s mandate, a first in the history of UN peacekeeping missions. This action was also decisive for the consideration of culture as a security issue, with the historic adoption by the UN Security Council in March 2017 of Resolution 2347” on the protection of heritage. 

International Pandemic Treaty

Joint Statement – “International Pandemic Treaty”

COVID-19 shows why united action is needed for more robust international health architecture
30 March 2021
[Editor’s text bolding]
The COVID-19 pandemic is the biggest challenge to the global community since the 1940s. At that time, following the devastation of two world wars, political leaders came together to forge the multilateral system. The aims were clear: to bring countries together, to dispel the temptations of isolationism and nationalism, and to address the challenges that could only be achieved together in the spirit of solidarity and cooperation, namely peace, prosperity, health and security.

Today, we hold the same hope that as we fight to overcome the COVID-19 pandemic together, we can build a more robust international health architecture that will protect future generations. There will be other pandemics and other major health emergencies. No single government or multilateral agency can address this threat alone. The question is not if, but when. Together, we must be better prepared to predict, prevent, detect, assess and effectively respond to pandemics in a highly coordinated fashion. The COVID-19 pandemic has been a stark and painful reminder that nobody is safe until everyone is safe.

We are, therefore, committed to ensuring universal and equitable access to safe, efficacious and affordable vaccines, medicines and diagnostics for this and future pandemics. Immunization is a global public good and we will need to be able to develop, manufacture and deploy vaccines as quickly as possible.

This is why the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) was set up in order to promote equal access to tests, treatments and vaccines and support health systems across the globe. ACT-A has delivered on many aspects but equitable access is not achieved yet. There is more we can do to promote global access.

To that end, we believe that nations should work together towards a new international treaty for pandemic preparedness and response.

Such a renewed collective commitment would be a milestone in stepping up pandemic preparedness at the highest political level. It would be rooted in the constitution of the World Health Organization, drawing in other relevant organizations key to this endeavour, in support of the principle of health for all.  Existing global health instruments, especially the International Health Regulations, would underpin such a treaty, ensuring a firm and tested foundation on which we can build and improve.

The main goal of this treaty would be to foster an all-of-government and all-of-society approach, strengthening national, regional and global capacities and resilience to future pandemics. This includes greatly enhancing international cooperation to improve, for example, alert systems, data-sharing, research, and local, regional and global production and distribution of medical and public health counter measures, such as vaccines, medicines, diagnostics and personal protective equipment.

It would also include recognition of a “One Health” approach that connects the health of humans, animals and our planet. And such a treaty should lead to more mutual accountability and shared responsibility, transparency and cooperation within the international system and with its rules and norms.

To achieve this, we will work with Heads of State and governments globally and all stakeholders, including civil society and the private sector. We are convinced that it is our responsibility, as leaders of nations and international institutions, to ensure that the world learns the lessons of the COVID-19 pandemic.

At a time when COVID-19 has exploited our weaknesses and divisions, we must seize this opportunity and come together as a global community for peaceful cooperation that extends beyond this crisis. Building our capacities and systems to do this will take time and require a sustained political, financial and societal commitment over many years.

Our solidarity in ensuring that the world is better prepared will be our legacy that protects our children and grandchildren and minimizes the impact of future pandemics on our economies and our societies.

Pandemic preparedness needs global leadership for a global health system fit for this millennium. To make this commitment a reality, we must be guided by solidarity, fairness, transparency, inclusiveness and equity.

By:
J. V. Bainimarama, Prime Minister of Fiji;
Prayut Chan-o-cha, Prime Minister of Thailand;
António Luís Santos da Costa, Prime Minister of Portugal;
Mario Draghi, Prime Minister of Italy;
Klaus Iohannis, President of Romania;
Boris Johnson, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom;
Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda;
Uhuru Kenyatta, President of Kenya;
Emmanuel Macron, President of France;
Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany;
Charles Michel, President of the European Council;
Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Prime Minister of Greece;
Moon Jae-in, President of the Republic of Korea;
Sebastián Piñera, President of Chile;
Andrej Plenković, Prime Minister of Croatia;
Carlos Alvarado Quesada, President of Costa Rica;
Edi Rama, Prime Minister of Albania;
Cyril Ramaphosa, President of South Africa;
Keith Rowley, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago;
Mark Rutte, Prime Minister of the Netherlands;
Kais Saied, President of Tunisia;
Macky Sall, President of Senegal;
Pedro Sánchez, Prime Minister of Spain;
Erna Solberg, Prime Miniser of Norway;
Aleksandar Vučić, President of Serbia;
Joko Widodo, President of Indonesia;
Volodymyr Zelensky, President of Ukraine
Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization.

::::::

COVID-19 vaccine and treatment innovators response to global leaders urgent call for international pandemic treaty – IFPMA
30 March 2021
[Editor’s text bolding]
In view of the social and economic impact of current COVID-19 crisis, political leadership in preparing for any eventual future pandemic is crucial. Over the last 12 months we have seen the importance of a strong innovation system and the successful development of several safe and highly effective vaccines in record time. The discussions around a possible International Pandemic Treaty need to take into account the important role played by the innovative biopharmaceutical industry and its supply chain in fighting the virus. It will be important to acknowledge the critical role played by the incentive system in developing tests, therapeutics, and vaccines to contain and defeat the coronavirus. We hope that the discussions on an International Pandemic Treaty will address enablers for future pandemic preparedness – the importance of incentives for future innovation, the immediate and unrestricted access to pathogens, and the importance of the free flow of goods and workforce during the pandemic – in addition to continuing the multi stakeholder approach undertaken in ACT-A and COVAX.
The biopharmaceutical industry and its supply chain is part of the solution for future pandemics and therefore should play a role in shaping an international Pandemic Treaty.
In the short term, in acknowledgement of the current coronavirus crisis, we hope politicians will support the free flow of goods and workforce, acknowledge the unprecedented efforts in collaboration and voluntary tech transfer across vaccine makers from developed and developing countries and show solidarity to ensure the highly effective COVID-19 vaccines reach people so that no one is left behind.

UNICEF fund aims to raise US$2.5 billion for COVID-19 health supplies; low- and middle-income countries set to benefit

UNICEF fund aims to raise US$2.5 billion for COVID-19 health supplies; low- and middle-income countries set to benefit
Denmark makes first donation to support the global equitable access to COVID-19 tests, treatments and vaccines
NEW YORK/COPENHAGEN, 30 March 2021 – UNICEF has launched a fund to support low- and middle-income countries access to COVID-19 health supplies, including vital tests, treatments and vaccines. The fund, which leverages UNICEF’s Procurement Services to purchase supplies, provides an opportunity for donors to join the largest health and vaccines supply operation the world has ever seen.

The Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator Supplies Financing Facility (“ACT-A SFF”) aims to initially raise US$2.5 billion by the end of 2021. Of this, US$1 billion is intended for vaccines and associated immunization campaign supplies including those not covered financially by the COVAX Facility, such as AMC92 country cost-sharing doses through COVAX and support for self-financing participants’ vaccine and delivery costs. Another US$1 billion is for diagnostics and US$500 million is for therapeutics.
Contributions to the facility will help bring the world closer to the global ACT-A goal of providing low- and middle-income countries with the health supplies they need to help bring the acute phase of the pandemic to an end.

“An undertaking of this magnitude requires immediate support, which is why UNICEF has established the ACT-A Supplies Financing Facility,” said Etleva Kadilli, Director of UNICEF Supply Division. “The facility serves as one of the most efficient and most impactful vehicles for supporting the global COVID-19 response by making targeted interventions to get supplies to where they are needed at competitive prices.”

The Government of Denmark has contributed to the fund with a donation of US$4.8 million for immunization supplies to be used in Africa. These supplies will include cold chain and personal protective equipment (PPE) that are essential for carrying out safe COVID-19 immunization campaigns…

The launch of the SFF also complements UNICEF’s efforts to accelerate access to lifesaving supplies, including vaccines and other non-immunization commodities, through its Vaccine Independence Initiative (“VII”) financial mechanism. In 2020, VII supplied hundreds of millions of doses of vaccines for non-COVID-19 immunizations, as well as millions of gloves, masks and medical supplies, as well as other essential commodities.

Coronavirus [COVID-19] – WHO Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Milestones :: Perspectives :: Research

Coronavirus [COVID-19] – WHO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

Weekly Epidemiological and Operational updates
Last update: 23 January 2021
Confirmed cases :: 129 902 402 [week ago: 125 781 957] [two weeks ago: 121 969 223]
Confirmed deaths :: 2 831 815 [week ago: 2 759 432] [two weeks ago: 2 694 094]
Countries, areas or territories with cases :: 223

::::::

29 March 2021
Weekly operational update on COVID-19 – 29 March 2021

30 March 2021
Weekly epidemiological update on COVID-19 – 30 March 2021
Overview
Globally, new COVID-19 cases rose for a fifth consecutive week, with just over 3.8 million new cases reported in the last week. The number of new deaths increased for the second consecutive week, increasing by 5% compared to last week, with over 64 000 new deaths reported. All regions reported an increase in the number of cases this week, and all regions, except for the African Region, reported an increase in the number of deaths. The European Region and the Region of the Americas continue to account for nearly 80% of all the cases and deaths.
In this edition, special focus updates are provided on:
:: COVID-19 and Health and Care Workers (HCWs)
:: SARS-CoV-2 variants

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is screen-shot-2021-04-04-at-1.36.45-pm.png

POLIO – Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC); WHO/OCHA Emergencies

Emergencies

POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)

Polio this week as of 31 March 2021

Summary of new WPV and cVDPV viruses this week (AFP cases and ES positives):
:: Afghanistan: five cVDPV2 cases and two cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Pakistan: two WPV1 and one cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Côte d’Ivoire: 34 cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Guinea: one cVDPV2 positive environmental sample
:: Liberia: three cVDPV2 positive environmental samples
:: Niger: one cVDPV2 positive environmental sample
:: Senegal: two cVDPV2 cas es and one positive environmental sample
:: South Sudan: three cVDPV2 positive environmental samples

::::::

Statement by UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore on killing of polio workers in Afghanistan
NEW YORK, 30 March 2021 – “Four polio vaccinators, three of them women, came under attack this morning, March 30, while carrying out their life-saving work for children in Nangarhar province, Jalalabad, Afghanistan. Tragically, the three women were killed.
“UNICEF is outraged by this attack.
“UNICEF expresses its deepest condolences to the families, colleagues and friends of the courageous vaccinators who were at the forefront of efforts to combat the spread of polio and keep Afghanistan’s children safe from this disabling disease.
“Frontline health workers should never be a target of violence. They must be able to carry out their life-saving activities in a safe and secure environment.
“UNICEF has been working for years with the Government, the World Health Organization, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative and partners on polio vaccination campaigns in the country.
“We remain committed to supporting polio eradication efforts in Afghanistan.”

::::::
::::::

WHO/OCHA Emergencies

Editor’s Note:
Continuing with this edition, we include information about the last apparent update evident on the WHO emergency country webpages, recognizing almost universal and significant interims since last update regardless of the level of the emergency listed.

WHO Grade 3 Emergencies [to 3 Apr 2021]

Democratic Republic of the Congo – No new digest announcements [Last apparent update: 12 Jan 2021]
Mozambique floods – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 3 November 2020]
Nigeria – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 29 Jun 2020]
Somalia – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 17 July 2020]
South Sudan – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 4 February 2020]
Syrian Arab Republic – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 24 October 2020]
Yemen – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 30 June 2020]

::::::

WHO Grade 2 Emergencies [to 3 Apr 2021]
Burkina Faso
:: Burkina Faso : visite du ministre de la santé et des Partenaires techniques financie… 01 avril 2021

Iraq
:: COVID Vaccines – Baghdad, 25 March 2021 – Amid a global shortage of COVID-19 vaccines, Iraq has received 336 000 doses of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine through the COVAX Facility…The AstraZeneca vaccines manufactured by SK-Bio Institute of South Korea arrived on Thursday 25 March 2021

Myanmar
:: 23 March 2021 News release Building Bangladesh Capacity on Infection Prevention and Control

Afghanistan – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 5 July 2020]
Angola – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 16 March 2021]
Burundi – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 04 July 2019]
Cameroon – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 22 August 2019]
Central African Republic – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 12 June 2018]
Ethiopia – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 22 August 2019]
Iran floods 2019 – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 2 March 2020]
Libya – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 7 October 2019]
Malawi Floods – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update 05 March 2021]
Measles in Europe – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 16-12-2020]
MERS-CoV – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 8 July 2019]
Mozambique – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 03 November 2020]
Niger– No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update:06 mars 2021]
occupied Palestinian territory – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 4 September 2019]
HIV in Pakistan – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 27 August 2019]
Sao Tome and Principe Necrotizing Cellulitis (2017) – No new digest announcements
Sudan – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 24 June 2020]
Ukraine – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 1 May 2019]
Zimbabwe – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 10 May 2019]

::::::

WHO Grade 1 Emergencies [to 3 Apr 2021]

Chad – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 30 June 2018]
Djibouti – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 25 novembre 2020]
Kenya – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 06 March 2021]
Mali – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 3 May 2017]
Namibia – viral hepatitis – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 20 July 2018]
Tanzania – No new digest announcements identified [Last apparent update: 21 October 2020]

::::::
::::::

UN OCHA – Current Emergencies
COVID-19 – No new digest announcements identified
Syrian Arab Republic – No new digest announcements identified
Yemen – No new digest announcements identified

::::::
::::::

The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 27 March 2021 :: Number 360

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDFThe Sentinel_ period ending 27 Mar 2021

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles