Heritage Stewardship :: Rebuilding marine life; Pan-genomics in the human genome era; Heritage destruction in Myanmar’s Rakhine state:

Featured Journal Content – Heritage Stewardship

Nature
Volume 580 Issue 7801, 2 April 2020
http://www.nature.com/nature/current_issue.html
Review Article | 01 April 2020
Rebuilding marine life
Analyses of the recovery of marine populations, habitats and ecosystems following past conservation interventions indicate that substantial recovery of the abundance, structure and function of marine life could be achieved by 2050 if major pressures, including climate change, are mitigated.
Carlos M. Duarte, Susana Agusti[…] & Boris Worm
Abstract
Sustainable Development Goal 14 of the United Nations aims to “conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development”. Achieving this goal will require rebuilding the marine life-support systems that deliver the many benefits that society receives from a healthy ocean. Here we document the recovery of marine populations, habitats and ecosystems following past conservation interventions. Recovery rates across studies suggest that substantial recovery of the abundance, structure and function of marine life could be achieved by 2050, if major pressures—including climate change—are mitigated. Rebuilding marine life represents a doable Grand Challenge for humanity, an ethical obligation and a smart economic objective to achieve a sustainable future.

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Nature Reviews Genetics
Volume 21 Issue 4, April 2020
https://www.nature.com/nrg/volumes/21/issues/4
Review Article | 07 February 2020
Pan-genomics in the human genome era
Although single reference genomes are valuable resources, they do not capture genetic diversity among individuals. Sherman and Salzberg discuss the concept of ‘pan-genomes’, which are reference genomes that encompass the genetic variation within a given species. Focusing particularly on large eukaryotic pan-genomes, they describe the latest progress, the varied methodological approaches and computational challenges, as well as applications in fields such as agriculture and human disease.
Rachel M. Sherman & Steven L. Salzberg

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International Journal of Heritage Studies
Volume 26, Issue 5 2020
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjhs20/current
Article
Heritage destruction in Myanmar’s Rakhine state: legal and illegal iconoclasm
Ronan Lee & José Antonio González Zarandona
Pages: 519-538
Published online: 21 Sep 2019
ABSTRACT
In this article we map heritage destruction in Myanmar’s Rakhine state. We outline the historic and contemporary political context in Myanmar explaining the background of the Rohingya Muslim ethnic group and addressing the contribution of religion and political change to anti-Rohingya discrimination and violence in Myanmar. We trace patterns of heritage destruction as legal and/ or illegal iconoclasm and specify the key elements of heritage destruction in Rakhine state. Our analysis focusses on the use of heritage destruction in Rakhine state as a tool of genocide, and we suggest that heritage destruction in Myanmar’s Rakhine state ought to be understood as part the authorities’ policies of genocide against the Rohingya. We conclude the article with a call for UNESCO to act to extend its ‘Unite4Heritage’ campaign to include the destruction of heritage by state actors.