Global Corruption Barometer – Africa 2019 – CITIZENS’ VIEWS AND EXPERIENCES OF CORRUPTION :: Transparency Intl

Governance – Corruption

Global Corruption Barometer – Africa 2019 – CITIZENS’ VIEWS AND EXPERIENCES OF CORRUPTION
The 10th edition of the Global Corruption Barometer (GCB) – Africa, reveals that while most people in Africa feel corruption increased in their country, a majority also feel optimistic that they, as citizens, can make a difference in the fight against corruption.
Transparency International 2019 :: 68 pages
PDF: https://www.transparency.org/files/content/pages/2019_GCB_Africa.pdf

Key Findings
01 Corruption is on the rise
More than half (55 per cent) of all citizens think that corruption increased in the previous 12
months. Only 23 per cent think it declined.

02 Many governments are failing to do enough
Only one in three citizens (34 per cent) thinks their government is doing a good job at fighting corruption, while 59 per cent rate their government’s performance as bad.

03 Concerns about the integrity of public officials remain high
Among key public institutions, police are most widely seen as corrupt: 47 per cent of people say most or all police are corrupt. But also almost four in 10 citizens think most or all government officials (39 per cent) and parliamentarians (36 per cent) are corrupt. These results are consistent with the last
round of findings in 2015, where citizens similarly thought that the police were the most corrupt institution.

04 Bribery demands are a regular occurrence for many
More than one in four citizens who accessed public services, such as health care and education, paid a bribe in the previous year. This is equivalent to approximately 130 million people.

05 People’s experience with bribery varies
Men are slightly more likely to pay a bribe than women, the poorest people are twice as likely to pay a bribe as the richest people, and young people aged 18-34 are more likely to pay a bribe than people
aged 55 and over.

06 Despite fears of retaliation, citizens can make a difference
Two-thirds of citizens fear retaliation if they report corruption. Yet, despite this, more than half of citizens surveyed (53 per cent) think ordinary people can make a difference in the fight against corruption…

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Press Release
One in four people in Africa pay bribes to access services, survey says
Corruption disproportionately affects the poor and young
11 Jul 2019 Issued by Transparency International Secretariat

The tenth edition of Global Corruption Barometer (GCB) – Africa, released on African Anti-Corruption Day by Transparency International in partnership with Afrobarometer, reveals that more than half of all citizens surveyed in 35 African countries think corruption is getting worse in their country. Fifty-nine per cent of people think their government is doing badly at tackling corruption.
The largest and most detailed survey of citizens’ views on bribery and other forms of corruption in Africa, the survey asked 47,000 citizens in 35 countries about their perceptions of corruption and direct experiences of bribery.

The results show more than 1 in 4 people who accessed public services, such as health care and education, paid a bribe in the previous year. This is equivalent to approximately 130 million people.
The report also highlights that corruption disproportionately affects the most vulnerable, with the poorest paying bribes twice as often as the richest. Young people pay more bribes than those over 55 years old.

“Corruption is hindering Africa’s economic, political and social development. It is a major barrier to economic growth, good governance and basic freedoms, like freedom of speech or citizens’ right to hold governments to account,” said Patricia Moreira, Managing Director of Transparency International. “While governments have a long way to go in regaining citizens’ trust and reducing corruption, these things don’t exist in a vacuum. Foreign bribery and money laundering divert critical resources away from public services, and ordinary citizens suffer most.”…