World Livestock: Transforming the livestock sector through the Sustainable Development Goals

Development – Livestock and Smallholders

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World Livestock: Transforming the livestock sector through the Sustainable Development Goals
FAO
Rome, 2018 :: 222 pages
http://www.fao.org/3/CA1201EN/ca1201en.pdf
To better support the transformation needed in the livestock sector and enhance its contribution
to the Sustainable Development Goals, the World Livestock (WoLi) report “Transforming the livestock sector through the sustainable development goals” examines the sector’s interaction with each of the Goals, as well as the potential synergies, trade-offs, and complex interlinkages involved. In this regard, this global report is intended to serve as a reference framework that Member States and stakeholders can consult as they move forward to realize livestock’s potentially major contribution to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The report shifts the focus of the livestock policy debate from fostering sustainable production per se to enhancing the sector’s contribution to the achievement of the SDGs. It calls for an integrated livestock sustainable development approach, and highlights the effective translation of the SDGs into specific and targeted national policy action as the major challenge ahead.

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Press Release
Harnessing the power of livestock to drive sustainable development
Sector can make major contributions to the 2030 agenda, but important choices have to be made
17 October 2018, Rome – A new FAO report highlights the multiple contributions made by the global livestock sector — especially to the lives of millions of poor, animal-dependent small-scale producers in developing countries — but also says that changes in policies and practices are needed in order to optimize those contributions.

According to World Livestock: Transforming the livestock sector through the Sustainable Development Goals, the debate around livestock production has so far been largely focused on how the sector can produce more to satisfy surging demand for animal products and feed a growing global population while at the same time reducing its environmental footprint.

While that is a worthwhile objective, FAO’s new report argues for a broader and more ambitious approach.

By realigning the livestock sector to better support the UN’s 2030 sustainable development agenda, it says that a wider range of benefits can be achieved – these include improved food and nutritional security but also extend into other realms, including access to energy, gender equality, improved environmental management and spreading peace and stability.

… Policies and practices that increase the livestock sector’s efficiency and reduce its environmental footprint should be vigorously pursued. For example, FAO studies have estimated that wider adoption of existing best practices and technologies in feeding, health and husbandry, and manure management — including greater use of currently underutilized technologies such as biogas generators — could help the global livestock sector cut its GHG emissions by as much as 30 percent.

Numbers of note
:: Currently, livestock production employs at least 1.3 billion people worldwide.
:: About 600 million of the world’s poorest households keep livestock as an essential source of income
Between 2000 and 2014, global production of meat rose by 39 percent; milk production increased by 38 percent.
:: Meat production is projected to increase another 19% by 2030, and milk production another 33% in the same period.
: Livestock production accounts for 40 percent agriculture output in developed countries and 20 percent of agricultural output in developing countries
:: Animals remain an important source of power. In India, for instance, two-thirds of the country’s cultivated area is ploughed using animal energy, and 14 million animal-drawn carts haul up to 15 percent of the country’s total freight.
:: The introduction of advanced genetics, feeding systems, animal health controls and other technologies over the past four decades allowed industrialized countries to reduce their overall land requirements for livestock by 20 percent while doubling meat production.
:: Wider adoption of existing best practices and technologies in feeding, health and husbandry, and manure management – as well as greater use of improved technologies – could help the global livestock sector cut its GHG emissions by as much as 30 percent.