From Google Scholar + [to 25 June 2016]

From Google Scholar & other sources: Selected Journal Articles, Newsletters, Dissertations, Theses, Commentary

International Journal of Research & Method in Education
Published online: 20 Jun 2016
Original Article
Respecting and fulfilling the right of post-primary pupils to consent to participate in trials and evaluative research: a discussion paper
DOI:
10.1080/1743727X.2016.1200028
Lisa K. Maguireab*, Bronagh Byrnec & Susan Kehoed
ABSTRACT
This paper provides an introduction to issues surrounding the participation rights of young people in research and the implications of their growing involvement in research as well as providing a discourse on the ethical implications related to consent. The unique contribution of this paper is that it considers children’s rights in respect to the increasing opportunities for young people to take part in evaluation research. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to acknowledge the growing involvement for young people in research and the implications of ensuring that their rights of participation are respected. Secondly, we will consider the children’s rights legislation and our obligations as researchers to implement this. Finally, we will explore consent as an issue in its own right as well as the practicalities of accessing participants. This paper will postulate that any research about young people should involve and prioritize at all stages of the research process; including participation in decision-making. We conclude by identifying five key principles, which we believe can help to facilitate the fulfilment of post-primary pupils’ ability to consent to participate in trials and evaluative research.

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Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)
Original Article
A Comparison of Two Methods for Recruiting Children with an Intellectual Disability
Dawn Adams1,*, Louise Handley1,2, Mary Heald1, Doug Simkiss3, Alison Jones1,
Emily Walls1 and Chris Oliver1
Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2016
Abstract
Background
Recruitment is a widely cited barrier of representative intellectual disability research, yet it is rarely studied. This study aims to document the rates of recruiting children with intellectual disabilities using two methods and discuss the impact of such methods on sample characteristics.
Methods
Questionnaire completion rates are compared between (i) participants being approached in child development centre waiting rooms and (ii), one year later, the same participants being invited to take part by phone, email and/or post.
Results
The face-to-face recruitment method resulted in a better recruitment rate (58.5% compared to 18.5%) and a larger sample (n = 438) than the telephone/email/post sample (n = 40). It also required less hours of researcher time per completed questionnaire.
Conclusions
In-line with previous research, recruitment of participants with intellectual disabilities (or their parents/carers) requires significant time and resources to get a sample of an acceptable size

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Australasian Journal on Ageing
Volume 35, Issue 2, pages 90–97, June 2016
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ajag.2016.35.issue-2/issuetoc
Review Articles
What keeps you strong? A systematic review identifying how primary health‐care and aged‐care services can support the well‐being of older Indigenous peoples
Carol Davy1,*, Elaine Kite1, Graham Aitken2, Garth Dodd3, Janice Rigney3, Jenny Hayes4 and
Jan Van Emden5
Abstract
Aim
The objective of this systematic review was to identify primary health-care or aged-care strategies that have or could support the well-being of older Indigenous peoples.
Methods
A search was undertaken of primary databases including Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Papers which reported on the perspectives of older Indigenous peoples, community members and provider participants were included. Findings were pooled using a meta-aggregative approach.
Results
Three high-level synthesised findings – maintaining Indigenous identity, promoting independence and delivering culturally safe care – were believed to be important for supporting the well-being of older Indigenous peoples.
Conclusions
As physical independence often diminishes with age, having the support of culturally safe primary health-care and aged-care services that understand the importance of maintaining an Indigenous identity and promoting independence will be crucial for the well-being of older Indigenous peoples.

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Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics
April 2016; 11 (2)
http://jre.sagepub.com/content/11/2.toc
Informed Consent—Uninformed Participants Shortcomings of Online Social Science Consent Forms and Recommendations for Improvement
EK Perrault, SA Nazione – Research …, 2016
June 21, 2016 1556264616654610
Abstract
As informed consent forms continue to lengthen, are these lengthening forms helping to create better informed participants? The aim of this research was to determine whether the length of consent forms affected reading frequency and comprehension, and to provide recommendations on how to improve consent forms in the social sciences so they are more likely to be read. A quasi-experiment was conducted using actual consent forms at two liberal arts schools, one requiring a long form (463 words, n = 73) and one requiring a shorter form (236 words, n = 57). Participants exposed to the shorter form reported fully reading, or at least skimming the form more frequently than those exposed to the longer form. Those exposed to the shorter form also comprehended more of the form’s information. The majority of participants indicated consent forms need to be shortened if researchers want future participants to be more likely to read these forms’ contents. Additional recommendations are discussed.

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World Medical & Health Policy
Volume 8, Issue 2, pages 197–200, June 2016
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wmh3.v8.2/issuetoc
Commentary
The Rapidly Increasing Number of Emergency Global Food Crises and the Implications for the International Community
Allan Jury –
. Abstract. The following text served as the basis of remarks delivered at the Second Annual Summit on Global Food Security and Health at the School of Policy, Government and International Affairs at George Mason University on October 15, 2015.