American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
June 15, 2016 – OAS
50 Million People in the Americas Self-Define as Indigenous.
The declaration is the first instrument in the history of the OAS to promote and protect the rights of the indigenous peoples of the Americas.

The Declaration recognizes:
:: The collective organization and multicultural and multilingual character of indigenous peoples.
:: The self-identification of people who consider themselves indigenous.
:: Special protection for peoples in voluntary isolation or initial contact, such as certain peoples of the Amazon, which is an aspect that distinguishes it from other similar initiatives.
:: That progress in promoting and effectively protecting the rights of the indigenous peoples of the Americas is a priority for the OAS.

Key points of the Declaration
:: Self-identification as indigenous peoples will be a fundamental criterion for determining to whom the Declaration applies.
:: Indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination.
:: Gender equality: indigenous women have collective rights that are indispensable for their existence, wellbeing, and comprehensive development as peoples.
:: Indigenous persons and communities have the right to belong to one or more indigenous peoples, in accordance with the identity, traditions, and customs of belonging of each people.
:: States shall recognize fully their juridical personality, respecting their forms of organization and promoting the full exercise of the rights recognized in the Declaration.
:: They have the right to maintain, express, and freely develop their cultural identity.
:: They have the right to not be subjected to any form of genocide.
:: They have the right not to be subject to racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, or other related forms of intolerance.
:: They have the right to their own cultural identity and integrity and to their cultural heritage.
:: They have the right to autonomy or self-government in matters relating to their internal affairs.
:: Indigenous peoples in voluntary isolation or initial contact have the right to remain in that condition and to live freely and in accordance with their cultures.
:: They have the rights and guarantees recognized in national and international labor law.
:: They have the right to the lands,