Development in Practice – Volume 25, Issue 7, 2015

Development in Practice
Volume 25, Issue 7, 2015
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cdip20/current

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Articles
Overcoming poverty and inequality: Rwanda’s progress towards the MDGs
DOI:10.1080/09614524.2015.1073691
Pamela Abbott, Roger Sapsford* & John Rwirahira
pages 921-934
Published online: 02 Sep 2015
Abstract
Despite the 1994 genocide there has been annual growth in Rwanda every year since 2000. Poverty has decreased; while the MDG target of 23.8% is unlikely to be met by 2015, the future looks hopeful. The goal of reducing hunger is measured by underweight children – already down to target – and extreme poverty – likely to hit the target. Key to success is reducing dependency on the land, but a majority of the population still depend on their farm or plot. However, hitting targets for reducing poverty is not the same thing as abolishing it, and achieving targets does not necessarily solve problems.

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Articles
NGOs as intermediaries in post-disaster rural reconstruction: findings from research in India
DOI:10.1080/09614524.2015.1072132
Bipasha Baruah*
pages 951-965
Published online: 02 Sep 2015
Abstract
Drawing upon research conducted in Gujarat, India, this article identifies the potential and limitations for NGOs to serve as intermediaries (between beneficiaries, governments, and international relief/development organisations) on post-disaster rural reconstruction projects. Findings reveal that NGOs can play important roles in facilitating the design and construction of high-quality, culturally appropriate housing; revitalising and diversifying livelihoods; and reducing physical and social vulnerability to future disasters. NGOs should have clearly defined roles, responsibilities, and accountability measures in post-disaster reconstruction projects, but they also need a certain amount of autonomy to protect their organisational philosophies and flexibility to make day-to-day decisions.

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Articles
Strengthening public health supply chains in Ethiopia: PEPFAR-supported expansion of access and availability
DOI:10.1080/09614524.2015.1069794
Daniel Taddesse*, David Jamieson & Logan Cochrane
pages 1043-1056
Accepted: 22 Jun 2015
Published online: 02 Sep 2015
Abstract
When the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)-supported Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) programme began working in Ethiopia in 2006, the estimated population of people living with HIV exceeded one million, while only 24,000 were on treatment and only 50 treatment sites were in operation. SCMS and other key partners entered into this context to support the Ethiopian government in significantly strengthening the public health supply chain system, with the aim of increasing the availability and accessibility of pharmaceutical products. The country now has 1,047 treatment sites and is nearing complete treatment coverage. This article discusses how priorities were set among many competing challenges from 2006 until 2014, and how the four-step strategy of build, operate, transfer, and optimise has resulted in a successful partnership.