A U.S. Humanitarian, Development and Peacebuilding Statement on the U.S. Global Countering Violent Extremism Agenda

A U.S. Humanitarian, Development and Peacebuilding Statement on the U.S. Global Countering Violent Extremism Agenda
July 20, 2015 :: 4 pages
20July2015_NR_CVECivilSocietyResponse.pdf
Mercy Corps and 40 colleague agencies express concern that the Obama administration’s new nine-point Action Agenda to counter violent extremism will repeat the same mistakes as post-9/11 stabilization initiatives, mainly prioritizing military funding over investments in solutions addressing the root causes of instability. The coalition urges the administration to modify the strategy ahead of September’s global summit on countering violent extremism.

Action for Community Development
Alliance for Peacebuilding
Association Femmes Sans Limites (Women Without Limits)
American Friends Service Committee
CARE USA
The Carter Center
CDA Collaborative Learning Projects
Charity & Security Network
Church of the Brethren, Office of Public Witness
Conference of Major Superiors of Men (CMSM)
Cure Violence
Facilitating Peace
Franciscan Action Network
Friends Committee on National Legislation
Humanity United
International Center for Religion and Diplomacy
International Rescue Committee
Islamic Relief USA
Jewish World Watch
KinderUSA
Life for Relief and Development
Mercy Corps
NETWORK, A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby
Nonviolence International
Nonviolent Peaceforce
Oxfam America
Partners for Democratic Change
Pax Christi International
Peace Alliance
Peace Direct
Project on Middle East Democracy (POMED)
Relief International
Saferworld
Salam Institute for Peace and Justice
Save the Children USA
Search for Common Ground
The Shift Network
Student Peace Alliance
Syria Relief and Development
United to End Genocide
World Vision

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Press Release
Invest in Non-Military Efforts to Counter Violent Extremism
July 20, 2015
Civil society coalition urges governments to prioritize prevention, peacebuilding and political solutions
Washington, DC — A coalition of U.S. civil society organizations, led by the global humanitarian organization Mercy Corps, is calling on the Obama administration to address the drivers of community grievances before violent extremism takes root, rather than relying primarily on militarized counter-terrorism responses.

“Billions spent on security operations are coupled with relatively minor investments in development, governance or humanitarian activities,” reads the coalition statement. “We urge that any strategy to address today’s complex threats focus on supporting communities and states to build safe, just, and resilient societies and addressing the core grievances fueling global radicalization.”

Mercy Corps and 40 colleague agencies express concern that the Obama administration’s new nine-point Action Agenda to counter violent extremism will repeat the same mistakes as post-9/11 stabilization initiatives, mainly prioritizing military funding over investments in solutions addressing the root causes of instability.

The coalition urges the administration to modify the strategy ahead of September’s global summit on countering violent extremism by:
:: Increasing investments in underfunded civilian-led prevention and peacebuilding programs.
:: Ensuring that security operations run by the Departments of Defense or State do not work at cross-purposes with development and peacebuilding efforts.
:: Reforming counterterrorism laws and regulations that prevent U.S. humanitarian organizations from working with communities affected by violent extremism.

“To have any hope of long-term success, a strategy to counter violent extremism must target the drivers of grievances, not just the symptoms,” says Andrea Koppel, vice president of Global Engagement and Policy at Mercy Corps. “Prevention and peacebuilding activities are chronically underfunded by the U.S. and other major government donors.”

A recent Mercy Corps study of key contributors to youth engagement in conflict found that experiences of injustice and abuse, not just unemployment or poverty, propel young people to take up arms. Mercy Corps believes that any initiatives to prevent violent extremism must address the root causes compelling young people to join.