Emergencies

Emergencies
 
 
POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)
Polio this week as of 08 January 2019
:: During the four-day visit to polio endemic countries of Afghanistan and Pakistan, WHO Director General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, reiterated WHO’s commitment to help endemic, outbreak and at-risk countries rid of poliovirus. Read the press release here.
:: In Mozambique, a circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) outbreak is confirmed.
 
 
Summary of new viruses this week:
:: Afghanistan – two WPV1-positive environmental samples;
:: Pakistan – nine WPV1-positive environmental samples;
:: Mozambique – one new case of cVDPV2.
 
 
WHO DG calls for concerted efforts to end polio during his visit to Pakistan and Afghanistan
10/01/2019
Endemic countries, WHO and partners are committed to eradicate polio
For Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO, the start to the new year was marked with a four-day visit to Afghanistan and Pakistan from 5-8 January. The visit came at the heels of his new role as the Chair of the Polio Oversight Board (POB) on 1 January, a committee which oversees and guides the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, signalling the Board’s utmost commitment towards eradication of polio for good.
Accompanied by WHO Regional Director for the Eastern Mediterranean Dr Ahmed Al-Mandhari, Dr Tedros’ well-knit, compact visit covered a lot of bases from field visits to high-level meetings with heads of state from both the countries, giving the POB an opportunity to see that while polio may still be in endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, but the process to achieve the goal of ending polio is not far from realization.
“We must all give our best on this last mile to eradicate polio once and for all. My wish for 2019 is for zero polio transmission. You have WHO’s full support to help reach every child and stop this virus for good,” Dr Tedros said…

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Editor’s Note:
WHO has posted a refreshed emergencies page which presents an updated listing of Grade 3,2,1 emergencies as below.
 
 
WHO Grade 3 Emergencies  [to 12 Jan 2019]
Democratic Republic of the Congo
:: 23: Situation report on the Ebola outbreak in North Kivu  8 January 2019
:: DONs  Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo   10 January 2019
[See Milestones above for more detail]
 
 
Bangladesh – Rohingya crisis – No new announcements identified
Myanmar – No new announcements identified
Nigeria – No new announcements identified
Somalia – No new announcements identified
South Sudan – No new announcements identified
Syrian Arab Republic – No new announcements identified
Yemen – No new announcements identified
 
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WHO Grade 2 Emergencies  [to 12 Jan 2019]
occupied Palestinian territory – No new announcements identified
Brazil (in Portugese) – No new announcements identified
Cameroon  – No new announcements identified
Central African Republic  – No new announcements identified
Ethiopia – No new announcements identified
Hurricane Irma and Maria in the Caribbean – No new announcements identified
Iraq – No new announcements identified
Libya – No new announcements identified
MERS-CoV – No new announcements identified
Niger – No new announcements identified
Sao Tome and Principe Necrotizing Cellulitis (2017) – No new announcements identified
Sudan – No new announcements identified
Ukraine – No new announcements identified
Zimbabwe – No new announcements identified
 
::::::
 
WHO Grade 1 Emergencies  [to 12 Jan 2019]
Afghanistan
Chad
Indonesia – Sulawesi earthquake 2018
Kenya
Lao People’s Democratic Republic
Mali
Namibia – viral hepatitis
Peru
Philippines – Tyhpoon Mangkhut
Tanzania

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UN OCHA – L3 Emergencies
The UN and its humanitarian partners are currently responding to three ‘L3’ emergencies. This is the global humanitarian system’s classification for the response to the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises. 
Syrian Arab Republic   – No new announcements identified
Yemen – No new announcements identified

::::::

UN OCHA – Corporate Emergencies
When the USG/ERC declares a Corporate Emergency Response, all OCHA offices, branches and sections provide their full support to response activities both at HQ and in the field.
Ethiopia  – No new announcements identified
Somalia  – No new announcements identified

::::::

“Other Emergencies”
Indonesia: Central Sulawesi Earthquake – No new announcements identified 

The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 5 January 2019

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDF: the sentinel_ period ending 5 jan 2019

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles and abstracts from 100+ peer-reviewed journals  [see PDF]

World has failed to protect children in conflict in 2018: UNICEF

Protection – Children in Conflict Zones

.
World has failed to protect children in conflict in 2018: UNICEF
Widespread violations against children in conflict continue in shocking year-on-year trend
NEW YORK, 28 December 2018 – The futures of millions of children living in countries affected by armed conflict are at risk, as warring parties continue to commit grave violations against children, and world leaders fail to hold perpetrators accountable – UNICEF said today.

“Children living in conflict zones around the world have continued to suffer through extreme levels of violence over the past 12 months, and the world has continued to fail them,” said Manuel Fontaine, UNICEF Director of Emergency Programmes. “For too long, parties to conflict have been committing atrocities with near-total impunity, and it is only getting worse. Much more can and must be done to protect and assist children.”

Children living in countries at war have come under direct attack, have been used as human shields, killed, maimed or recruited to fight. Rape, forced marriage and abduction have become standard tactics in conflicts from Syria to Yemen, and from the Democratic Republic of the Congo to Nigeria, South Sudan and Myanmar.

Over the course of 2018:
:: In Afghanistan, violence and bloodshed remain a daily occurrence, with some 5,000 children killed or maimed within the first three quarters of 2018, equal to all of 2017, and children making up 89 per cent of civilian casualties from explosive remnants of war.

:: Cameroon has seen an escalation of the conflict in the North-West and South-West regions of the country, with schools, students and teachers often coming under attack. In November, more than 80 people, including many children, were abducted from a school in Nkwen, in the north-west of the country and released a few days later. To date, 93 villages have allegedly been partially or totally burned due to conflict in the areas, with many children experiencing extreme levels of violence.

:: In the Central African Republic, a dramatic resurgence in fighting has enveloped much of the country, with two out of three children in need of humanitarian assistance.

:: In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, inter-ethnic violence and clashes between security forces and armed groups/militia in the Great Kasai-region and in the eastern provinces of Tanganyika, South Kivu, Nord Kivu and Ituri have had a devastating impact on children. The response to the ongoing Ebola outbreak has been seriously hindered by violence and instability in eastern DRC. In addition, an estimated 4.2 million children are at risk of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The situation is compounded by violations of children’s rights, including forced recruitment by armed groups and sexual abuse.

:: In Iraq, even as fighting has largely subsided, four children were killed in November in the north of the country when the truck they were travelling to school in came under attack. Children and families returning to their homes in areas previously impacted by heavy violence continue to be exposed to the danger of unexploded ordnance. Thousands of families remain displaced and now face the additional threats of freezing winter temperatures and flash floods.

:: In the Lake Chad basin, ongoing conflict, displacement and attacks on schools, teachers and other education facilities have put the education of 3.5 million children at risk. Today in northeast Nigeria, the Lake region of Chad, extreme north of Cameroon and Diffa region of Niger, at least 1,041 schools are closed or non-functional due to violence, fear of attacks, or unrest, affecting nearly 445,000 children.

:: A recent surge in violence in the border region between Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger has left 1,478 schools closed.

:: In Myanmar, the UN continues to receive reports of ongoing violations of the rights of Rohingya remaining in northern Rakhine State, which include allegations of killings, disappearances and arbitrary arrests. There are also widespread restrictions on the rights to freedom of movement and barriers to access health and education including in central Rakhine State. Ensuring children have access to quality education and other essential services will avert a ‘lost generation’ of Rohingya children; otherwise, they will lack the skills they need to contribute to society.

:: In northeast Nigeria, armed groups, including Boko Haram factions, continue to target girls, who are raped, forced to become wives of fighters or used as ‘human bombs’. In February, the group abducted 110 girls and one boy from a technical college in Dapchi, Yobe State. While most of the children have since been released, five girls died and one is still being held captive as a slave.
In Palestine, over 50 children were killed and hundreds more injured this year, many whilst demonstrating against deteriorating living conditions in Gaza. Children in Palestine and Israel have been exposed to fear, trauma and injuries.

:: In South Sudan, relentless conflict and insecurity throughout the annual lean season pushed 6.1 million people into extreme hunger. Even with the advent of the rainy season, more than 43 per cent of the population remain food insecure. While the promise of a revitalized peace-agreement offers a glimmer of hope for children, reports of extreme violence against women and children continue, most recently in Bentiu, where more than 150 women and girls reported suffering horrific sexual assault.

:: In Somalia, more than 1,800 children were recruited by parties to the conflict in the first nine months of the year, with 1,278 children abducted.

:: In Syria, between January and September, the UN verified the killing of 870 children – the highest number ever in the first nine months of any year since the start of the conflict in 2011. Attacks continued throughout the year, including the killing of 30 children in the eastern village of Al Shafa in November.

:: In eastern Ukraine, more than four years of conflict have taken a devastating toll on the education system, destroying and damaging hundreds of schools and forcing 700,000 children to learn in fragile environments, amidst volatile fighting and the dangers posed by unexploded weapons of war. The situation is particularly severe for 400,000 children who live within 20km of the “contact line”, which divides the government and non-government-controlled areas and where shelling and extreme levels of mine-contamination pose a lethal threat.

:: and in Yemen, the UN has verified 1,427 children killed or maimed in attacks, including an ‘unconscionable’ attack on a school bus in Sa’ada. Schools and hospitals have come under frequent attack or been used for military purposes, denying children access to their right to education and health care. This is further fueling a crisis in a country where every 10 minutes, a child dies due to preventable diseases, and 400,000 children suffer from severe acute malnutrition.

“2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the landmark Convention on the Rights of the Child and the 70th anniversary of the Geneva Conventions, yet today, more countries are embroiled in internal or international conflict than at any other time in the past three decades. Children living through conflict are among the least likely to be guaranteed their rights. Attacks on children must end,” Fontaine said.
UNICEF calls on all warring parties to abide by their obligations under international law to immediately end violations against children and the targeting of civilian infrastructure, including schools, hospitals and water infrastructure. UNICEF also calls on states with influence over parties to conflict to use that influence to protect children.

“Much more needs to be done to prevent wars, and to end the many disastrous armed conflicts devastating children’s lives. Yet even as wars continue, we must never accept attacks against children. We must hold warring parties to their obligation to protect children. Otherwise, it is children, their families and their communities who will continue to suffer the devastating consequences, for now, and for years to come,” Fontaine said.

Across all these countries, UNICEF works with partners to provide the most vulnerable children with health, nutrition, education and child protection services. For example, in October, UNICEF helped to secure the release of 833 children recruited into armed forces in northeast Nigeria, and are working these children to reintegrate them into their communities. Since conflict broke out in South Sudan five years ago, UNICEF has reunited almost 6,000 unaccompanied and separated children with their families. In Bangladesh, in 2018, UNICEF reached thousands of Rohingya refugee children with mental health and psychosocial support. In Iraq, UNICEF is working with partners to provide specialized services to women and children affected by gender-based violence.

Editorial: Yemen needs a concrete plan—now :: Lancet Global Health

Featured Journal Content

Lancet Global Health
Jan 2019 Volume 7 Number 1e1-e159
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/issue/current
Editorial
Yemen needs a concrete plan—now
The Lancet Global Health
More than 3 years into the current conflict, the situation in Yemen has reached catastrophic proportions. These have been exacerbated by the collapse of the national economy and by intense fighting around Hodeidah, the country’s principal port on the Red Sea where most commodities, including food and medicines, enter the largely import-based Yemeni market. The planned peace negotiations are dependent on the goodwill of two warring parties whose disregard for international law has already led to large civilian casualties and the destruction of essential infrastructure such as health facilities, water systems, roads, and markets. As the world barely watches, at the convergence of all these events, an estimated 14 million Yemeni people—half of the country’s population—have now been brought to pre-famine conditions.

The global apathy in the face of Yemen’s continuing struggle has been disrupted in recent weeks. Increased media attention to the plight of hundreds of thousands of severely malnourished children has led to renewed concerns about the fate of the Yemeni people. On Nov 26, the CEOs of five international non-governmental organisations openly called out the role of US geopolitics and trade in the killing of innocent civilians, spurring discussions on the global responsibility for the war. And probably because one number sometimes speaks louder than words, earlier on Nov 21, Save The Children presented in a press release their straightforward estimation for the number of deaths due to untreated severe acute malnutrition between April 2015 and October 2018: close to 85 000 children under 5 may have died a preventable death in that period.

In truth, most health-related numbers coming from Yemen cannot be more than estimations—how could a collapsed health system generate robust data? But we know that the Yemeni people are suffering. Of all the scourges affecting Yemen, the prospect of a famine seems to have taken centre-stage in the media again, but there are many other enduring ones. We know that civilians are dying in the conflict, though unofficial data are vague and largely underestimated. We know there are outbreaks of diphtheria, measles, and probably other vaccine-preventable diseases. We also know that the cholera epidemic that started in April 2016 is still going on: the latest report available from the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office indicates that there were over 240 000 cases in the first 42 weeks of 2018. This cholera epidemic, the largest documented in history, illustrates how a weakened population, and a crippled health system, can be swiftly and durably overpowered in the midst of conflict. However, it is also an opportunity to learn, in the hope that this situation can be reversed in Yemen, and prevented elsewhere.

Thankfully, such learnings are happening. In May 2018, The Lancet Global Health published a modelling study by Anton Camacho and colleagues in which surveillance data were used to identify the drivers of the cholera epidemic, linking rainfall to the second wave of the epidemic, generating potentially important information for timing and enhancing control efforts. In a subsequent exchange of letters with Fekri Dureab and colleagues, the authors evoke the difficulties in identifying the mechanisms of transmission, in spite of robust modelling, in part because the war’s disruption of water and sewerage systems confounds the analysis.

Also importantly, in a report released on December 4, the Johns Hopkins Center for Humanitarian Health presents a detailed evaluation, based on an in-depth review and data gathered through 71 key informants, of the epidemic preparedness and response up until the second wave in July 2018. It brings forth unsurprising but sobering facts, among them the likely association between the conflict and increased cholera transmission; the lack of preparedness in terms of surveillance and response capacity; or coordination issues between international and national actors of the response. The 20 global and Yemen-specific recommendations cover the fundamental need of addressing insecurity, of urgently clarifying and harmonising coordination and preparedness, and of making the response more agile by improving surveillance. They include specifics of a targeted WASH and vaccination response and rely on strong integration of planning across sectors, all sensible responses to the issues identified in the analysis.

These concrete, action-related reports should be precious input in tackling this and future outbreaks, particularly in war-torn areas. But Yemen needs even more—and the time is now.

Ebola – Democratic Republic of the Congo

Ebola – Democratic Republic of the Congo

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21: Situation report on the Ebola outbreak in North Kivu 
27 December 2018 [Excerpts]
Situation Update
…As of 25 December 2018, a total of 585 EVD cases, including 537 confirmed and 48 probable cases (Table 1), were reported from 16 health zones in the two neighbouring provinces of North Kivu and Ituri (Figure 1), of which 13 reported at least one confirmed case in the last 21 days (5-25 December 2018). Over this period, 117 confirmed cases were reported from 13 health zones, the majority of which were concentrated in major urban centres and towns in Katwa (30), Komanda (20), Beni (15), Butembo (15), and Mabalako (15), which remain the main hotspots of this outbreak.

Trends in case incidence reflect the continuation of the outbreak across these geographically dispersed areas. The general decrease in the weekly incidence observed in Beni since late October is continuing; however, the outbreak is intensifying in Butembo and Katwa, and new clusters have emerged in other health zones.

Forty-one additional deaths among confirmed and probable cases occurred since our last report on 18 December 2018. Overall, 356 cases have died (case fatality 61%), including 308 among confirmed cases. As of 25 December 2018, 201 patients have recovered and been discharged from ETCs.

A healthcare worker from Mabalako has been reported among the new cases, bringing the number of healthcare workers affected to 54, with 18 deaths…

Case management
On 24 November 2018, MoH announced the launch of a randomized control trial for Ebola therapeutics. This first-ever multi-drug randomized control trial within an outbreak setting, is an important step towards finding an effective evidence-based treatment for Ebola. The trial is coordinated by WHO and led and sponsored by the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s National Institute for Biomedical Research (INRB) which is the principal investigator. The trial has begun in the ALIMA Ebola treatment center (ETC) in Beni, where patients are enrolled in the study after obtaining voluntary informed consent.

Other ETCs continue to provide therapeutics under the MEURI (compassionate use) protocol, in collaboration with the MoH and the INRB, together with supportive care measures. WHO is providing technical clinical expertise on-site and is assisting with the creation of a data safety management board. UNICEF is providing nutritional treatment and psychological support for all hospitalized patients.

As of 25 December 2018, a total of 131 patients were hospitalised in transit centres and ETCs, of whom 29 were laboratory confirmed.

…Implementation of ring vaccination protocol
On 25 December 2018, 138 contacts were vaccinated, along with 201 contacts of contacts and 62 front line workers in 12 vaccination centres.
From 17 to 26 December 2018, 5,491 new people were vaccinated, The cumulative number of people vaccinated as of 26 December 2018 was 53 610.
Vaccination rings were opened around confirmed cases in Vutetse, Kanzulinzuli, Keyshero, Matanda, Muchanga, Vungi, Nyankunde, Wanamahika, and Aloya…

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DONs Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo   
28 December 2018
[Excerpt]
…WHO risk assessment
This outbreak of EVD is affecting north-eastern provinces of the country bordering Uganda, Rwanda and South Sudan. Potential risk factors for transmission of EVD at the national and regional levels include: travel between the affected areas, the rest of the country, and neighbouring countries; the internal displacement of populations. The country is concurrently experiencing other epidemics (e.g. cholera, vaccine-derived poliomyelitis, malaria), and a long-term humanitarian crisis. Additionally, the security situation in North Kivu and Ituri at times limits the implementation of response activities. WHO’s risk assessment for the outbreak is currently very high at the national and regional levels; the global risk level remains low. WHO continues to advice against any restriction of travel to, and trade with, the Democratic Republic of the Congo based on currently available information.

As the risk of national and regional spread is very high, it is important for neighbouring provinces and countries to enhance surveillance and preparedness activities. The International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) Emergency Committee has advised that failing to intensify these preparedness and surveillance activities would lead to worsening conditions and further spread. WHO will continue to work with neighbouring countries and partners to ensure that health authorities are alerted and are operationally prepared to respond.

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Emergencies

Emergencies

POLIO
Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)
– No new announcements identified

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::::::

Editor’s Note:
WHO has posted a refreshed emergencies page which presents an updated listing of Grade 3,2,1 emergencies as below.

WHO Grade 3 Emergencies  [to 5 Jan 2019]
Democratic Republic of the Congo
:: 21: Situation report on the Ebola outbreak in North Kivu  27 December 2018
:: DONs Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo   28 December 2018
[See Milestones above for more detail]

Bangladesh – Rohingya crisis
:: Weekly Situation Report 57 – 27 December 2018
[Excerpt]
KEY HIGHLIGHTS
:: About 30 health facilities have received exemption from restricted movement during the election period and will remain open to provide essential health services.
:: About 363 411 people (110.6%) benefited from the OCV campaign including 264,280 people (117.5%) from Rohingya population.
:: Since February 2018 to date, a total of 35,148 BCG doses have been given children and 19 906 Td doses to pregnant women.
SITUATION OVERVIEW
:: There are an estimated 908,000 Rohingya refugees (215,796 families) in Cox’s Bazar, according to the latest Needs and Population Monitoring (NPM) round 12 exercise. The Rohingya refugees continue to arrive in Bangladesh, though the overall influx has slowed since the onset of the crisis in late August 2017. Rohingya refugees have continued to arrive in Bangladesh, though in much fewer numbers than the initial influx in late 2017. More than 15,247 new arrivals were reported from 1 January to 30 November 2018 (source: UNHCR). The refugees continue to face compounding vulnerabilities including health.
:: Over the past one year, WHO and the health sector partners responded to the health needs of the affected populations by supporting government health facilities with human resources, renovations and medical supplies; ensuring availability of essential medicines and other supplies through logistics support; maintaining a strong disease surveillance system; delivering vaccination campaigns and strengthening

Syrian Arab Republic
:: SIDA donation helps WHO support health care services in southern Syria [Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency]  27 December 2018

Yemen
:: Cholera and malnutrition in Yemen threatens millions
27 December 2018
…WHO works closely with the Ministry of Health and WASH cluster partners to contain cholera outbreaks, offering technical and logistical support to strengthen disease surveillance, assist diarrhoeal treatment and oral rehydration centres, train health workers on case management, deploy rapid response teams and improve sanitation and access to safe water.
There have been 280,198 suspected cases of cholera since the beginning of 2018, and 372 associated deaths. Children under 5 account fort 32% of the total suspected cases. Cholera has been reported in 22 out of Yemen’s 23 governorates, and 306 out of the country’s 333 districts.

Myanmar – No new announcements identified
Nigeria – No new announcements identified
Somalia – No new announcements identified
South Sudan – No new announcements identified

::::::

WHO Grade 2 Emergencies  [to 5 Jan 2019]
occupied Palestinian territory
:: 1.2 million people in the occupied Palestinian territory are in need of humanitarian health assistance – December 2018

Libya
:: WHO condemns attack on Al Jala Hospital in Benghazi
27 December 2018 – The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly condemns the armed attack on Al Jala Hospital in Benghazi, Libya, on 25 December. The attack resulted in damage to the hospital infrastructure.

Brazil (in Portugese) – No new announcements identified
Cameroon  – No new announcements identified
Central African Republic  – No new announcements identified
Ethiopia – No new announcements identified
Hurricane Irma and Maria in the Caribbean – No new announcements identified
– No new announcements identified
Iraq – No new announcements identified
MERS-CoV – No new announcements identified
Niger – No new announcements identified
Sao Tome and Principe Necrotizing Cellulitis (2017) – No new announcements identified
Sudan – No new announcements identified
Ukraine – No new announcements identified
Zimbabwe – No new announcements identified

WHO-AFRO: Outbreaks and Emergencies Bulletin, Week 52: 22 – 28 December 2018
The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 59 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key ongoing events, including:
:: Ebola virus disease outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
:: Measles in Madagascar
:: Humanitarian crisis in Nigeria.:::::

WHO Grade 1 Emergencies  [to 5 Jan 2019]
Afghanistan
Chad
Indonesia – Sulawesi earthquake 2018
Kenya
Lao People’s Democratic Republic
Mali
Namibia – viral hepatitis
Peru
Philippines – Tyhpoon Mangkhut
Tanzania

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UN OCHA – L3 Emergencies
The UN and its humanitarian partners are currently responding to three ‘L3’ emergencies. This is the global humanitarian system’s classification for the response to the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises. 
Syrian Arab Republic   – No new announcements identified
Yemen – No new announcements identified

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UN OCHA – Corporate Emergencies
When the USG/ERC declares a Corporate Emergency Response, all OCHA offices, branches and sections provide their full support to response activities both at HQ and in the field.
Ethiopia 
:: Operational Plan for Rapid Response: Internal Displacement around Kamashi and Assosa (Benishangul Gumuz) and East and West Wollega (Oromia), 26 December 2018

Somalia 
:: Humanitarian Bulletin Somalia, 1 – 31 December 2018

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“Other Emergencies”
Indonesia: Central Sulawesi Earthquake
:: 24 December 2018  –  Central Sulawesi Earthquake & Tsunami – Humanitarian Country Team Situation Report #10 (as of 10 December 2018)

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The Sentinel

Human Rights Action :: Humanitarian Response :: Health :: Education :: Heritage Stewardship ::
Sustainable Development
__________________________________________________
Week ending 22 December 2018

This weekly digest is intended to aggregate and distill key content from a broad spectrum of practice domains and organization types including key agencies/IGOs, NGOs, governments, academic and research institutions, consortia and collaborations, foundations, and commercial organizations. We also monitor a spectrum of peer-reviewed journals and general media channels. The Sentinel’s geographic scope is global/regional but selected country-level content is included. We recognize that this spectrum/scope yields an indicative and not an exhaustive product. Comments and suggestions should be directed to:

David R. Curry
Editor
GE2P2 Global Foundation – Governance, Evidence, Ethics, Policy, Practice
david.r.curry@ge2p2center.net

PDF: The Sentinel_ period ending 22 Dec 2018

Contents
:: Week in Review  [See selected posts just below]
:: Key Agency/IGO/Governments Watch – Selected Updates from 30+ entities   [see PDF]
:: INGO/Consortia/Joint Initiatives Watch – Media Releases, Major Initiatives, Research:: Foundation/Major Donor Watch -Selected Updates
:: Journal Watch – Key articles and abstracts from 100+ peer-reviewed journals  [see PDF]